Pot Roast-Style Meatballs

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Happy Day-After-Thanksgiving Everyone!

Did you all have a great holiday with their families? Cook a lot? Eat too much? Watch lots of TV?

Was anyone brave enough to venture out this morning for Black Friday- I hope not. Honestly I just don’t think it’s worth the effort anymore. The Internet and online shopping has (I think) done a good job of making it so that there doesn’t necessarily have to be such a rush or panic for good deals. Granted, there are some things that you have to go and stand in line to get, but c’mon, honestly: are they REALLY worth it?

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Alright, alright. I confess: I have participated in Black Friday a handful of times before. But it was mostly during the 90’s, when online shopping was just getting started and stores were only making their deals available in-house. It does give you a weird kind of adrenaline rush, but not a particularly enjoyable one. Me, I’m a worrier: so naturally, the build up to Black Friday for someone like me would be the fear that I’m getting up early in the morning, risking my safety and raising my stress level for something I’m not even 100% guaranteed to get. What if I can’t run fast enough when they open the doors? What if I’m next to some psycho crazy woman who elbows me in the face as we’re reaching for the same thing? What if someone literally tries to take it out of my cart or hands even if I do get it?

Not that any of that has actually happened to me before (in fact, on the few occasions I did go out for Black Friday, I got what I wanted), but I say all of that just to emphasize that my personality is just not suited for all that craziness. I don’t like conflict, chaos or mean people…and that’s basically what Black Friday is ALL about. So I just stay out of it now.

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So, this is Pot Roast weather. You have to make pot roast during the winter. It’s pure comfort food that sticks to your ribs and just make you feel all warm and fuzzy inside. Problem  is, depending on the size of the meat, it can be a little time consuming. I encountered this problem a little while ago when I wanted some pot roast, but #1, didn’t have enough time to make it, and #2, didn’t really want to pay full price on a piece of good beef that wasn’t on sale at the grocery store. What was on sale though, was the ground turkey, which gave me the idea of trying to replicate the flavors typically found in pot roast, in a meatball. It worked out very well with my Pizza Meatballs, so I didn’t see why it would be so bad to try it out here.

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This may not be true pot roast, but I am still really happy with how it turned out. The flavors still REALLY do come out in the meatballs, and because they’re ground turkey, you can feel a little bit better about having them versus red meat (if you care about watching your red meat intake anyway). If you read the recipe, you will see that I did cut some corners and used one of those Liptons packets to make my gravy. If you’re a purist who believes in only flour-roux based gravy, then that’s fine. Make it that way. I was just in a hurry and needed some gravy for my pot roast meatballs, and this does the job in a pinch. All in all, this is dish turned out really good. It’s not pot roast, but it definitely still has that comforting, stick to your ribs quality that’s really good for this time of year.

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I was very glad that Angie@TheNoviceGardener asked me back to co-host this weeks Fiesta Friday #44 with my good friend Prudy@ButterBasilandBreadcrumbs. It’s a real treat, and I hope all of you can join us, as we always have a lot of fun. If you’re interested in swinging by to contribute, or even just to see what the rest of us are bringing to the party this week, then just click the icon link below. Hope to see you there!

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Pot Roast-Style Meatballs

Recipe by Jess

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Ingredients

For Meatballs

  • 3 lbs. ground turkey
  • 1 lb. Turkey sausage
  • 1 packet (.87 oz) of onion (or brown) gravy mix (Like Liptons)
  • 2 tsp. dried oregano
  • 1 tsp. dried basil
  • 1/4 tsp. ground thyme
  • A few dashes of Worcestershire sauce
  • 1 1/2 cups Panko breadcrumbs (and 1/2 cup more, if needed)
  • 1 egg, beaten

For Gravy

  • 1 packet of Brown gravy mix (Like Liptons)
  • 1-2 tbsp. flour

 Directions

1. Preheat oven to 350°. Place a wire rack over a half sheet pan and spray with non-stick cooking spray. Set aside

2. Combine all ingredients for meatballs together in a large bowl. If mixture feels too wet to shape, then add remaining half cup of breadcrumbs.

3. Shape meat into golf-ball sized meatballs and place onto wire rack. Bake in oven for 35 to 45 minutes, or until meatballs reach an inner temperature of 165° F.

4. Follow package instructions for gravy, adding additional flour to thicken, if desired. Drizzle on top of the meatballs and serve with white rice or egg noodles.

Slow Cooker Pork Carnitas

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There are certain important, iconic historic events that when they happen, you’ll always remember exactly where you were.

I was very young both times around, but I remember where I was when President Bill Clinton was elected. Both times in 1992, and in 1996: my grandparent’s living room, watching TV with my grandpa.

Strangely enough, I remember where I was the day that O.J. Simpson was acquitted of the murder of his wife: again, my grandparents living room watching the verdict unfold on Geraldo Rivera.

I remember where I was on December 31st/January 1st, 1999 when everyone was holding their breath, thinking the world was going to end in the year 2000. I was at my other grandmother’s house in Detroit with my Dad and sisters and we all were laughing about it.

I remember where I was on September 11th, 2001; my 7th grade English class. My teacher had left in the middle of class for a few minutes, then come back into the room and without saying a word to us, just turned on the TV and switched to CNN. I still remember that first image I saw of the smoke billowing out from the World Trade Center, and not fully realizing what it was I was really seeing.

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I remember where I was when Hurricane Katrina struck New Orleans in 2005; I was visiting my Aunt in Atlanta and was horrified at the images and video footage the news was reporting, not just from the hurricane itself, but also from the aftermath. The first few weeks when I got back to high school, several of the student organizations I was apart of were collecting food, toiletries and clothe donations to send down there to help out.

I remember where I was when President Barack Obama was first elected; in 2008 me and Jas were in our dorm room, watching the election results on our tv through tears of joy and near disbelief. To date, that night is one of the best nights I’ve ever had in my life. (I remember where I was the night of his re-election in 2012 too, but that night in 2008 will always and forever be particularly special to me)

I remember where I was when I found out that Michael Jackson died in 2009. I was in the kitchen cooking and my Mom came in and told me that the story was trending on the internet. I refused to believe it for a really long time. When it finally was confirmed as true, I felt an unexpected sadness and depression that lingered with me for a few days.

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Right up there with all those super duper important, iconic historical events I’ve lived to see, I’m gonna go ahead and add another to that list.

I’ll always remember where I was the day that I first made pork carnitas. It was a sunny Sunday afternoon. I was in the kitchen, while my mom and sister Ashley were watching the tv show The Blacklist in the living room.

Yep. This recipe is that important and life-changing to me.

You have to understand, I’ve never done this before. I didn’t even really know what I was doing, I just knew that carnitas was something I’d always wanted to make for myself.

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So when my grocery store finally put their pork butt (shoulder)on sale, I just went out and bought one of those bad boys, along with some basic ingredients that I knew were traditionally used in making carnitas.

The first good sign was the smell coming out of my slow cooker when I woke up on Sunday morning after letting the shoulder do it’s thing overnight. It was friggin glorious, people. I went in the kitchen and pressed my face up against the glass lid like a kid looking through the glass of a candy store, trying to see what ind of magic was going on in that crockpot that smelled so delicious. The steam and heat had created too many bubbles for me to see unfortunately, so I had to exercise an INCREDIBLE amount of self-restraint from yanking off the lid and let it keep cooking for another few hours. I wasn’t taking any chances. I wanted to make sure I had that type of pork that’s been cooked to low and slow perfection. It needed to practically melt off the bone with little to no force or resistance.

Kinda like the way I get after watching “The Avengers” and seeing Chris Hemsworth’s arms and Chris Evans work a punching bag.

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Good things come to those who wait. I found that out when I finally couldn’t take it anymore and lifted my crockpot lid. The steam from the pork hit me in the face. It was like, the best kiss I ever had

Okay, maybe not the best kiss I ever had. But pretty darn close. I wanted to break out in Snoopy dances when I took a fork and pierced the meat. I didn’t even have to pull, guys. I just touched it. And it FELL off the bone. Fell, I tell you. If I thought it couldn’t get any better, I was wrong. Because a few minutes underneath the broiler elevates these carnitas from mere mortal (albeit delicious) viddles, to the Food of the Gods.

Moist, fork-tender pork that literally melts in your mouth. A hint of crusty caramelization. This is living.

Something this simple to make really shouldn’t taste this good. It just shouldn’t. It almost feels like I’m cheating. Life’s not a fairy tale like that, am I right?!

So why did this dish turn out SO GOOOOOOOOD?!

I’m going to the Fiesta Friday #43, hosted by Angie@TheNoviceGardener and co-hosted this week by  Tracy @Scratch It and Stephanie @The Cozy Cook. I’ll also be bringing these carnitas. See you there…

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Slow Cooker Pork Carnitas

Recipe by Jessica@Cooking Is My Sport

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Ingredients

  • 4-6 lbs. pork shoulder, slightly trimmed of excess fat
  • 1 tbsp. garlic salt
  • 1 tsp. chili powder
  • 2 tsp dried oregano
  • 1 tsp. dried basil
  • 1 tsp. Cumin
  • 1/2 tsp ground coriander
  • 1 1/2 tsp brown sugar
  • 1 tsp. sweet paprika
  • 2 oranges, sliced in half
  • 1 lime, sliced in half

Directions

1. Combine garlic salt, chili powder, dried oregano, dried basil, cumin, ground coriander, brown sugar, and sweet paprika.

2. Rub the spice mixture evenly over the pork. Place pork in the bottom of a slow cooker (minimum of 6 quarts)*

3. Squeeze the juice from the oranges and limes over the pork. Place rinds pulp side down in slow cooker over the meat.

4. Cover and cook on low for 10-12 hours, or until pork is tender and falling off the bone. Use a fork to pull away from bone and discard it.

5. Preheat oven broiler. Line a half sheet pan with parchment paper and arrange pork in a single layer. Place underneath broiler until tips of pork are browned and slightly crisp, about 3-5 minutes. (Don’t walk away from it. Keep an eye on meat to make sure it doesn’t burn or become overly browned).

6. Serve finished pork in corn/flour tortillas, or over rice.

*I had to use 2 slow cookers too cook a 6lb. pork shoulder that I ended up cutting in half, so keep that in mind when buying your meat.

Chewy Jumbo Chocolate Chip Cookies

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So, I know I haven’t posted anything since last week. That’s pretty lame, especially since I try to put out 2 posts within a seven day period. I had two smokin hot posts with smokin hot recipes ready to share with you all on Tuesday and on Friday.

But it didn’t happen.

Don’t be mad at me. It wasn’t my fault. I’m as ticked off about it as you. The truth is, I didn’t post because I literally didn’t have access to a steady internet connection for 5 days.

You guys want to hear a good story? Cause I’ve got one.

We’ve had the same cable and internet provider for about 5 years. We’ll call them “C”. We never really liked C. Nobody really likes C. Their customer service is sloppy, unprofessional and all around crap. The equipment they stuck us with is almost always out of date and malfunctioning.   But the price has always been right (i.e. affordable), so we put up with C’s crap and went with their service anyway.

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Until Monday- when suddenly out of the blue, our cable and internet was completely cut out. After resetting routers, cable boxes, unplugging and re-plugging all the plugs, we finally braved the terror’s that s C’s customer service line and called to try and find out what is wrong. What we received for our efforts was an automated voice message system informing us that they were aware of an outage of cable & internet in our entire apartment building, they had technicians working on it and power should be restored at 2:00 pm.

2:00 pm came. No restoration. We called and got the same message- except this time, they said the power would be restored at 5:00 pm.

5:00 pm comes. No restoration. We called. Got the same message- but now, it wouldn’t be until 9:00 pm.

9:00 pm rolls around. Do I really need to continue here or can you guess what they said next?

Eventually, technician from C shows up later the following day,does some poking around and determines that the cord that connects C cable and internet to not just us, but our entire apartment building has been cut.

Seriously. Someone cut the cord. My first thought was: Who DOES that?! My second one was: When do I get my Internet back?

We made an appointment with C for Wednesday to come and fix the cord and restore the cable and Internet. Not only did no one should up, but when I called to complain they informed me that someone had gone ahead and canceled the entire appointment and the soonest they could come out now was Friday. I thought that this was more than enough to get me heated, but oh no. There was more to come. C calls us the next morning and says that they will now be unable to come at all to fix the cable and internet. Why?

Because they’ve been completely banned from our apartment complex by the landlord.

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Not kidding guys. C is no longer allowed to service anyone living in our building, or even so much as step foot on the premises of our apartment complex. This was a decision made without the notification or knowledge of ANY of the tenants, mind you. We just had to find out the hard way. When we called him to find out why such a drastic action was taken we were told that it was because in spite of the expensive renovations that our building has underwent over the past year, C had refused to update their wiring system from outside, to inside like they were asked to by our landlord.

So he banned them completely. Two words: Cat. Fight.

But apart from all that, this also meant that not only would we be without cable or internet for yet ANOTHER day, we now had to research and shop around for an entirely new service provider, then hope, pray and wish that they could make it out sometime soon to get us set up. A few hours go by, and we settle on another provider. Let’s just call them “A”. A had a package that was very similar to what we had with C. Not only that, but they said they would be able to come out on Friday to get us set up. How’s that for service?

Friday comes. The A technician shows up- on time (which is more than anyone could ever say for C), and starts to get to work. You’d THINK this would be relatively simple fix. But no.  Not at all. Care to guess why?

Someone also cut the  existing “A” cord that’s supposed to provide cable and internet to the building. Still not kidding.

At this point, I told my older sister that this whole thing was a lost cause. The Gods were against our cause. They just didn’t want us to have cable and internet anymore. She told me to cheer up and have a little faith.

Well God Bless those A technicians. They arrived at our place around 11:00 a.m. Friday morning, and didn’t leave until 7:30 pm….when we FINALLY got our internet and cable back.

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After an ordeal like that, I need some kind of compensation- y’know, for the  pain, suffering and whatnot that 5 days without internet does to someone. And what better than recompense than chocolate chip cookies?

Do me a favor: hold out your hand, palm facing up. Measure the distance between the edge of your palm to about the middle knuckle of your thumb. That’s a pretty big space, right?

Well, that’s about how big these cookies are.

And they’re not just any chocolate chip cookies, guys. That won’t work here. I’m talking about the best chocolate chip cookies I’ve EVER made or had, and that’s not an exaggeration. They really are.  Apart from being ginormous, they’re also incredibly soft and chewy on the inside with just a hint of crunch at the rims. Which is how homemade chocolate chip cookies ought to be- anything else is an impostor. If you want crunchy chocolate chip cookies then go out and buy some Chips Ahoy.

This recipe says you can bake the cookies from 10-14 minutes, but listen: don’t go over 11. Just don’t do it. I took mine out at 10 minutes and thirty seconds. Yes, I most certainly did wait in front of the oven with my phone timer to count the seconds. That’s what it takes for perfect chocolate chip cookies.

Once they’ve cooled, store them in an air-tight container with a slice of bread- that will make sure they stay soft for days on end. Microwave for about 20 seconds on a napkin- they’ll practically melt in your mouth.

That’s it guys. I’ve got nothing else, besides heading over to the Fiesta Friday #42 super late to share these cookies, hosted by Angie@TheNoviceGardener and co-hosted this week by Tracy @Scratch It and Stephanie @The Cozy Cook.

How was YOUR week? As eventful as mine? I doubt it, but I’m willing to be surprised.

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Chewy Jumbo Chocolate Chip Cookies

Recipe Courtesy of Land O Lakes.com

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Ingredients

  • 4 1/4 cups all-purpose flour
  • 1 teaspoon baking powder
  • 1 teaspoon baking soda
  • 1 teaspoo nsalt
  • 1 1/2 cups Butter, softened
  • 1 1/4 cups sugar
  • 1 1/4 cups firmly packed brown sugar
  • 2 Eggs
  • 1 tablespoon vanilla extract
  • 1 (12-ounce) package (2 cups)real semi-sweet chocolate chunks or chocolate chips

 

Directions

1. Combine flour, baking powder, baking soda and salt in bowl; set aside.

2. Combine butter, sugar and brown sugar in another bowl. Beat at medium speed, scraping bowl often, until creamy.

3. Add eggs and vanilla. Continue beating, scraping bowl often, until well mixed.

4. Gradually add flour mixture, beating at low speed until well mixed. Stir in chocolate chunks.

5. Refrigerate dough for at least four hours, but preferably overnight.

6. Heat oven to 375°F.

7. Drop dough by 1/4 cupfuls, 2 inches apart, onto ungreased cookie sheets. Bake 10-14 minutes or until light golden brown. (Do not overbake.) Cool 1 minute on cookie sheets; remove to cooling rack.

Thai Marinated Chicken Skewers

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So I know I’ve mentioned before in my Shepherd’s Pie post that I would never, ever, ever EVER think about going to Culinary School or setting out to be some kind of professional chef in a restaurant. This is definitely still the case. I haven’t changed my mind. It’s not gonna happen.

Having said that, I am willing to say that I wouldn’t completely rule out having some kind of career role that has to do with food. In fact, I think I can visualize the perfect culinary career for me.

If there are any people reading this that work in the food industry and are looking to hire someone to do these duties, feel free to look over my conditions and shout me a holler if it sounds like a good fit.

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My ideal work space is a high rise studio loft in NYC with tall windows and high ceilings- this’ll give me plenty of ventilation and natural light.

I’m gonna need a Kenmore fully furnished kitchen with the latest appliances- and I mean the WORKS; two to three double wall ovens with advanced temperature control, one convection oven, both a flat top and standard grill, two French door refrigerators, a chest freezer, 3 Kenmore Elite dishwashers (because I hate washing dishes), 2 standing mixers, 2 food processors, a hand blender, 2 slow cookers, one deep fryer, and one panini press.

I need the pantry that comes on Master Chef or Iron Chef America- just to make sure I’ve got the ‘essentials’.

While they’re at it, Kenmore could also go ahead and furnish the cookware and dishes too- (just call it for promotional purposes).

And counter space. Lots and lots of counter space. If you could see what I’m working with in our apartment right now, you would definitely understand the desperation behind that request.

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I know, I know. All of that sounds really demanding. But it really wouldn’t go to waste, I swear. See, in my dream culinary job, I would go into work in this space every single day putting every single one of these tools to good use in simply recipe writing, testing and perfecting.

You’re scared of baking, and you need someone to bake a cake for your kid’s birthday? Tell me what they like, and I’ll make it for you.

You want someone to give a review of a cookbook? Send it over to me and I will make every single recipe and give my rating.

Are you a really bad cook and engaged to marry someone who’s used to good homemade eating? We’ll go over some of their favorite foods and I’ll teach you how to make them so that you guys don’t have to starve or order take out after you say ‘I do’.

I could also envision a community service aspect of that job where I would link up with the local homeless shelters or churches and organize a weekly night  where I can serve all the food I spent my ‘workday’ making to a number of people down on their luck who are in need of a good home cooked meal.

So yeah, that’s my dream job: a life where all I do is is cook simple, comfort food all day long, then give the food away to other people. And get paid to do it. That would be the life.

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Hey, it’s another chicken kabobs recipe. And I STILL chose not to make it on the grill like I was ‘supposed’ to. How about them apples.

As yummy as the Sambal Chicken Skewers I made a little while ago were, my family said that they thought these tasted even better. I think it’s the spices in the marinade that does it: I’m just a huge fan of curry powder and all of it’s subtle sweetness with just enough bite to pack a punch. In fact, I love it so much that I don’t even care that I have to scrub and scrub my counter tops super hard to get those dark yellow stains out when I accidentally spill some. And that’s saying something.

Don’t skip on making this peanut sauce. It’s just too good to miss out on. Plus, what else are you going to use to drizzle over the chicken and rice you’re going to eat this with? Nothing, that’s what. You can’t make Thai chicken without a peanut sauce. That’s just not the way the world works.

Whoa, I just remembered it was Fiesta Friday #41. Good thing I’ve got something to bring and share with all of you, huh? Thanks to Angie@TheNoviceGardener for hosting, and especially to Nancy @Feasting With Friends and  Loretta @Safari of the Mind for co-hosting. See you at the party!

 

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Thai Marinated Chicken Skewers


Recipe Adapted from Cooking Channel

Ingredients

  • 3 pounds skinless, boneless chicken breasts, cut into 1- inch cubes
  • 24 wooden skewers, soaked overnight in water

For the Marinade

  • 1/4 cup soy sauce
  • 3 tablespoons firmly packed dark brown sugar
  • 2 tablespoons fresh lime juice
  • 2 tablespoons oil
  • 1 tablespoon curry powder
  • 2 garlic cloves, minced
  • 1 teaspoon finely minced fresh ginger
  • 1/2 teaspoon ground cardamom

Peanut Coconut Sauce

  • One 13.5-ounce can coconut milk
  • 1/4 cup creamy peanut butter
  • 1/4 cup firmly packed dark brown sugar
  • 1 tablespoon soy sauce
  • 1 1/2 teaspoons red curry paste

Directions

1. Place the chicken in a medium bowl. Whisk all the marinade ingredients together in a separate bowl.

2. Pour the marinade over the chicken and massage the meat with your hands for 1 minute to coat the cubes well.

3. Cover the bowl with plastic wrap and marinate in the refrigerator for at least 1 hour or as long as overnight.

4. Preheat oven to 350 degrees. Lay a piece of aluminum foil or parchment paper on 2 half sheet pans and place a baking rack on top of each. Spray racks with non-stick cooking spray.

5. Thread 4-5 pieces of chicken one each skewer, and arrange on top of baking racks. Bake in oven for 25-30 minutes, until chicken reaches inner temperature of  165 degrees.

6. While chicken is baking, prepare peanut sauce: Combine the coconut milk, peanut butter, brown sugar, soy sauce, and red curry paste in a saucepan and cook over medium heat for 3 minutes, stirring occasionally.

7. When chicken is done, brush finished sauce over chicken cubes, and serve.

Cinnamon Swirl Pumpkin Rolls

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Happy Halloweeeeeeeeeeeen!!!

What’s everyone’s plans for tonight? Anyone going out with kids for trick or treating? Got a Halloween party you’re going to? What are you dressing up as?

I’ve always liked dressing up for Halloween and although I haven’t gotten to do it very often, I still have some ‘Wish-List’ costumes that I’d love to be able to do someday.

1) A 20’s flapper is definitely something I’d like to be- with the bobbed hair, flashy dress and pearls to go with it.

2) I’d LOVE to dress up in a fancy Venetian Masquerade ballgown and mask, with an elegant hairdo.

3) I’d love to be Harley Quinn, as long as I could have a guy go with me as the Joker.

4) One of the “Grease” Pink Ladies.

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5) Black Widow- because that cat suit Scarlett Johannson wore in “The Avengers”  was everything.

6) I’d love to be one of the fairy tale characters like Little Red Riding Hood or the Queen of Hearts. (And no, I don’t mean one of those costumes that make you look like you should be standing on a street corner, if you know what I mean. I think that there are plenty of ways you can make a costume beautiful and tastefully done without it being too slutty.)

7) If I ever get a boyfriend, I am GOING to be Christine and make him dress up as the Phantom of the Opera. He will have absolutely no choice or say in the matter. It’s a prerequisite if he wants to date me.

Unfortunately, I’m not doing anything special in particular like dressing up or going to any parties. But I am staying in my kitchen- which is plenty ‘special’ enough for me.

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I’ve known for a while now that I was going to make this dish for Halloween. Cinnamon rolls have been on my Cooking Bucket  List for a while, and I had a can of pumpkin that was languishing in my pantry, without very much to do. That set the perfect stage for Pumpkin Cinnamon Rolls.

It was my first time making cinnamon rolls, and I think they turned out pretty good for a beginner like moi. I walked away with a few things to keep in mind for next time: roll the dough VERY tight so the sugar filling doesn’t leak out while the dough is going through their second rise, and don’t be afraid to place them pretty close together in the pan so that they can rise higher up rather than further out.

Aside from all that, the taste is really spot on for these. For one, they make your house smell like every yummy Autumn pastry imaginable while they’re baking. The pumpkin flavor admittedly isn’t very overpowering, but I’m actually okay with that as sometimes the taste of pumpkin can be a little abrasive. I know that crystallized ginger isn’t the cheapest spice to buy, but if you can afford it I gotta strongly recommend that you don’t leave it out. It gives spiciness to the filling that balances the sweetness of the sugar, while the dried cherries give it an acidic tang. I iced my rolls almost as soon as they came out of the oven so that the icing would melt into the crevices of the dough rather than just sit on top of it in thick globs. Tastes better that way. Also, these save very well in the refrigerator; when ready to eat another one just wrap it in paper towel, sprinkle with a few drops of water then microwave for about 15-20 seconds. It’ll still taste pretty fresh.

These rolls are going to this week’s Fiesta Friday #40, hosted by Angie@TheNoviceGardener and co-hosted this week by Margy @La Petite Casserole and Jhuls @The Not So Creative Cook. See you all there.

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Halloween is one of my absolute favorite times of year, but not for the reason that you may think.

It’s not that I don’t like dressing up in costumes. I do. It’s not that I don’t like candy. I definitely do. But the arrival of Halloween marks the arrival of something infinitely more thrilling and exciting for me than costumes or sweets (and if you know me, then you know that that’s really saying something).

I look forward to October 31st because it marks the final day before I officially begin my countdown to Christmas.

Me and my twin sister are obsessed with Christmas, and as such, we try to get in our Holiday spirit as soon as is reasonably possible. I know that other people wait until Thanksgiving, but that’s way too late for me. I like the extra month to start listening to my Christmas playlist on my mp3 player and Pandora radio stations, and start planning all the wonderful goodies that I’m going to make for the 12 Days of Christmas series on Cooking Is My Sport.

Speaking of which, I am willing to take special requests for that ahead of time. I need 12 recipes for 12 Christmas goodies to post on the blog. Suggestions? Don’t be shy 😉

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Cinnamon Swirl Pumpkin Rolls

  • Servings: 9-12 rolls
  • Difficulty: intermediate
  • Print

Recipe Courtesy of King Arthur Flour

Ingredients

For the Dough:

  • 1 cup canned pumpkin or squash
  • 2 large eggs
  • 2 tablespoons to 1/4 cup lukewarm water*
  • 1/4 cup soft butter
  • 2 1/2 cups King Arthur Unbleached All-Purpose Flour
  • 1 3/4 cups King Arthur White Whole Wheat Flour
  • 1/4 cup Baker’s Special Dry Milk or nonfat dry milk
  • 1 teaspoon ground cinnamon
  • 1/2 teaspoon ground ginger
  • 1/4 teaspoon ground cloves, optional
  • 3 tablespoons brown sugar, light or dark
  • 1 1/2 teaspoons salt
  • 2 teaspoons instant yeast

For the Filling:

  • 3/4 cup granulated sugar
  • 1 tablespoon ground cinnamon
  • 1/4 cup minced, crystallized ginger
  • 1/4 cup dried cranberries or cherries

For the Glaze

  • 1 cup glazing or confectioners’ sugar
  • 1 tablespoon butter
  • 1 1/2 tablespoons milk, or enough to make a “drizzlable” glaze

Directions

1) Mix and knead all of the dough ingredients together — by hand, mixer, or bread machine — until you’ve made a soft, fairly smooth dough.

2) Place the dough in a lightly greased bowl, cover the bowl, and allow the dough to rise for 1 1/2 hours, until it’s almost doubled in bulk.

3) Turn the dough out onto a lightly greased surface. Roll it into a 14″ x 22″ rectangle; the dough will be thin.

4) Mix the cinnamon and sugar. Spread a thin layer over the dough, leaving one short edge free of filling.

5) Sprinkle with crystallized ginger or dried fruit (or both), if desired.

6) Starting with the short end that’s covered with filling, roll the dough into a log.

7) Cut the log into nine 1 ½”-thick rolls.

8) Place the rolls into a lightly greased 9″ x 9″ pan that’s at least 2″ deep. Set aside, covered, to rise for 1 hour, or until the rolls look puffy.

9) Bake the rolls in a preheated 375°F oven for 25 to 30 minutes, until they’re lightly browned and feel set.(Internal temp should be about 185-190 degrees F) Remove them from the oven, and set them on a rack.

10) To make the glaze: Heat the butter and milk together till the butter melts. Whisk into the sugar.

11) Drizzle the rolls with the warm glaze. (For a thinner layer, spread with icing almost as soon as you take them out of the oven. For a thicker icing, let them cool for about 15 minutes, then spread with icing.) 

Yangzhou Fried Rice

Yangzhou Fried Rice1

So, I have this soft spot.

It’s pretty frequent that whenever I’m in a shopping center or a private small business or restaurant and I see that the workers/owners aren’t getting much business, I feel really bad and sympathetic towards them. Yes, even if they’re those people that set up the stands in the mall and try to accost you while you’re walking just to test/buy their product. I know that the retail/food industry business is cutthroat and very competitive. I know that it’s not my fault if they have slow business. I know that I’m not obligated to buy anything- and to be honest, I usually don’t. But it doesn’t keep me from empathizing with them either. They have to make a living like everyone else, and their ability to do so or not depends on whether or not they can convince complete strangers to open their wallets. It’s a real sticky, precarious situation when you think about it.

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Why am I even talking about this? Well, when I was putting together this dish and this post, it made me think of this Asian restaurant that used to be in the food court of the local mall when I was still in grade school, years ago. I won’t say the name of the place, but it was independently owned by this couple that looked like they were in their mid-to upper 50’s. Every time I went to the mall, it just never seemed like anyone was buying anything from this place. The man and his wife would come in and out of the kitchen in the back, filling and emptying the dishes they had available, all the while looking at the passing shoppers as if wishing just a few of them to stop and buy something- anything- from their restaurant. If I can be completely honest, I’ll just go ahead and admit that there was a good reason that this place didn’t get much business. All of the ‘standard fare’ that you’d see in an American Chinese restaurant was on their menu, but the sad reality was that it wasn’t really well seasoned. Like, at all. Their recipes needed serious work.

I can still remember how sorry I felt for them, even as a little girl. And I wished I could’ve been able to tell that I really felt like they would’ve gotten more business if they changed up how they made their fried rice.

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It’s just my personal opinion, but I do think that a good Chinese restaurant starts with how they make their fried rice. In my experience, if they make excellent fried rice, then chances are the rest of the menu is pretty spot on too. Because let me just say up front one thing that I’ve learned: all fried rice is NOT created equal. I’ve had some really good fried rice over the years, and then I’ve had some that was frankly, pretty terrible. It wasn’t until I decided to make some for myself that I realized how easy it is for fried rice to go wrong. And to be perfectly honest, there are a couple of Chinese restaurants I’ve been to that make fried rice that taste even better than this recipe. But nobody’s perfect, and I do have to say that I’m pleased with how it came out for my first time….er, maybe my second. Technically.

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See, technically my first attempt didn’t turn out so well. I maaaaaaay have ruined the first batch of Jasmine rice that I made. The rice is supposed to be one day old, so I made the Jasmine rice the night before I wanted to make the fried rice. It was really late at night and I was in a hurry to get to bed, so long story short, I don’t think I let it cook long enough. There was too much moisture still in the rice by the next day so the grains stuck together. Have you ever tried to ‘stir-fry’ gummy rice? It doesn’t work very well. And turns out, it tastes pretty bad too.

As rotten luck would have it, that was all the fresh Jasmine rice I had. All that was left in my pantry was Minute rice that you steam in water in the microwave. So I was forced to call in the cavalry on this one, folks. It’s still rice, it just didn’t need that long to cook. You won’t hold it against me, will you? I mean, it turned out into a pretty yummy dish. And now, you guys know that this dish can me made with Minute Rice and still turn out pretty awesome. It’s all apart of Cooking is My Sport Quality Control, I swear.

I’ll be bringing this dish to this week’s Fiesta Friday #39, hosted by Angie@TheNoviceGardener and co-hosted this week by Suzanne @apuginthekitchen and Sue @Birgerbird, See you there!

 

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Yangzhou Fried Rice

Recipe Courtesy of Ching-He Hunag

Ingredients

  • 2 tablespoons peanut oil
  • 3 eggs, lightly beaten
  • 1 tablespoon peeled and grated ginger
  • 1 medium carrot, cut in 1/4-inch dice
  • 4 ounces cooked Chinese pork (char siu) or ham, cut in 1/4-inch dice
  • 3 fresh shiitake mushrooms, stemmed and diced
  • 1 cup frozen peas
  • 3 cups cooked jasmine rice, a day old
  • 1 to 2 tablespoons light soy sauce
  • Sea salt and freshly ground white pepper
  • 1 teaspoon toasted sesame oil
  • 1 to 2 green onions, sliced on a diagonal, for garnish

Directions

1. For the fried rice: Heat a wok over high heat and add 1 tablespoon peanut oil. Add the eggs and scramble, then set aside on a plate.

2. Add the remaining 1 tablespoon peanut oil to the wok. Add the ginger and stir-fry for less than 1 minute. Then add the carrots and stir-fry for 1 minute more.

3. Add the pork, and mushrooms and cook for 2 minutes. Then add the peas and cooked rice and toss together. Add the cooked egg back into the wok.

4. Season the mixture with the light soy sauce, salt and pepper. At the very end add the sesame oil, if using. Check the seasoning and adjust to taste with salt and pepper. Garnish with green onions and serve immediately.

Old Fashioned Sour Cream Donuts

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I’d like to take this opportunity to drop a few nuggets of truth on all of you, if that’s okay.

Nobody is normal. Nobody.

Fears are nothing more than stories that we tell ourselves.

A person who is nice to you, but rude to the waiter, is not a nice person.

Nothing is really lost- until your mom can’t find it, that is. Then, it’s just gone forever.

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Lastly ( and perhaps most  importantly)…it is always, ALWAYS, a good ‘time to make the donuts’.

For those that may not know, the Dunkin’ Donuts company featured a commercial with a character named Fred the Baker who appeared in commercials with the trademark ‘catchphrase’: “Time to Make the Donuts”. It was a pretty popular ad, and was also parodied in one of my favorite Saturday Night Live sketches with Jon Lovitz. It’s really all I could think about when I was putting this post together, and I think that that really says something to the centrality of donuts in life in general. Think about it: there’s no time, event or circumstance when it’s not a good time for some donuts.

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Had a lousy day at work? Time to make/eat some donuts.

 Your favorite team won the game? Time to make/eat some donuts.

Fight with the spouse/significant other? Time to make/eat some donuts.

Payday? Time to make/eat some donuts.

Fiesta Friday? Definitely time to make/eat some donuts.

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I mentioned in some of my earlier posts that I recently got into the mood to make some donuts from scratch. My sisters wanted these Cinnamon Bun Doughnuts and Apple Cider Donuts. And me, well I wanted these.

A good old fashioned sour cream donut just like the ones you get from the bakery.

Guys. Guys, guys, guuuuuuuuys.

Drop whatever you’re doing, print out this recipe and get in your kitchen. ‘Cause it’s time to make the donuts. These donuts. Right now.

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This recipe is so good, I honestly wouldn’t be able to tell the difference between these donuts, and ones you would buy from a bakery. The dough creates the perfect browned, crusty crevices that have just enough body for the icing to seep into, solidify and form the most delightful pools of pure sugary goodness. It’s just what a sour cream donut should be, and I meant JUST: golden brown and crusty on the outside, soft and  flakey tender on the inside, with the sour cream giving it just enough of a subtle tang to complement the sweetness of the icing. One of the best donuts, I’ve ever had, hands down.

And yeah, I’m more than a little pleased and proud that I was the one to make them.

I’m bringing these donuts to this week;s Fiesta Friday #38 hosted by Angie@TheNoviceGardener and co-hosted this week by Hilda and Julianna. Don’t fight over  them all at once, guys. There’s plenty enough to go round-for now…

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Old Fashioned Sour Cream Donuts

Recipe Adapted from Completely Delicious via  Hand Forged Doughnuts

CLICK HERE FOR PRINTABLE VERSION

Old Fashioned Sour Cream Donuts

Ingredients

For Donuts

  • 2 1/4 cup (255 grams) cake flour
  • 1 1/2 teaspoon baking powder
  • 1 teaspoon salt
  • 1/2 teaspoon ground nutmeg
  • 1/2 cup (100 grams) sugar
  • 2 tablespoons butter flavored shortening
  • 2 large egg yolks
  • 1/2 cup (4 fluid ounces) sour cream
  • Canola oil, for frying

For Glaze

  • 3 1/2 cup (350 grams ) powdered sugar, sifted
  • 1 1/2 teaspoon corn syrup
  • 1/4 teaspoon salt
  • 1/2 teaspoon vanilla extract
  • 1/3 cup (2 1/2 fluid ounces) hot water

Directions

1. In a bowl, sift together the cake flour, baking powder, salt and nutmeg.

2. In the bowl of a stand mixer fitted with a paddle attachment, beat the shortening and sugar together until sandy. Add the egg yolks and mix until light and thick.

3. Add the dry ingredients to the mixing bowl in 3 additions, alternating with the sour cream, ending with the flour, scraping the sides of the bowl down as necessary. The dough will be sticky. Spoon it into a clean bowl, cover with plastic wrap and chill for 1 hour.

4. On a floured surface, roll out the chilled dough to about 1/2 inch thick. Use a donut cutter or two differently sized biscuit cutters to cut out as many donuts as possible, dipping the cutters into flour as necessary to prevent sticking.

5. Pour the canola oil into a heavy bottomed pot to at least 2 inches deep. Heat to 325 degrees F. Add the donuts to the heated oil a few at a time, careful not to overcrowd the pot. Fry on each side about 2 minutes, but watch to make sure they don’t burn.

6. Let drain on a paper bag to soak up the excess grease.

7. Mix all ingredients in a bowl with a whisk until smooth. Dip each donut into the glaze, making sure they are covered completely. Place on a wire rack above a sheet pan to catch any excess glaze. Let sit for 20 minutes until glaze is set.

8. Store in an air tight container at room temperature for a few days.

Apple Cider Donuts

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Sometimes, I really miss being in the very early years of elementary school.

Morning and afternoon recess periods were awesome.

You can’t beat ‘homework’ that consisted of coloring in the lines and tracing out capital and lower case letters.

Sitting in a circle and singing with my classmates while my teacher played “The Farmer in the Dell” on the piano was cheesy, but still fun.

Yes, all of that was fine, but when I say I really miss those early years of school, I feel I should emphasize that what I really mean was that I miss the food part of it.

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I don’t know how it was for you guys, but at my elementary school,  there were certain foods that we all knew we could count on seeing and eating every season.  Because we all know that little kids can be placated and satisfied with treats.

Actually you can still kinda say that about me now. But I digress.

At Christmas, we were given candy canes and frosted cookies. Valentines Day meant we always held class valentine and candy exchanges. Around St. Patrick’s Day we got pancakes dyed with green food coloring. And at this time of year, we knew that we were gonna go on a field trip to a real life apple orchard, and ultimately end up eating apple cider and donuts. I gotta say, of all the food ‘holidays’ we had, the Apple Cider and Donuts holiday was my favorite.

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I got it into my head a little while ago that I really wanted to make donuts from scratch. Like really, really, REALLY wanted to. I took my usual poll of the family to see what they wanted. Jas wanted a cinnamon bun-style doughnut, which resulted in these absolutely heavenly Cinnamon Roll Doughnuts. Ashley (our resident apple cider addict) wanted Apple Cider Donuts. And me- well, we’ll get to that in a later post. For now, let’s just focus on these.

I had a cut out recipe from Yankee Magazine that I really wanted to try and looked easy enough for someone like me who’s never made her own donuts from scratch before. At first after rolling and cutting out the dough, I was skeptical that I had done it wrong as the dough didn’t seem thick enough to give me the thick, fluffy cake donuts that I had originally wanted to make. However, once these babies hit the hot oil in the deep fryer, they puffed ALLLLLLL the way up. The intense apple flavor of these is really just amazing, and I do think that it was due to the concentrated flavor that came from the boiled cider, so don’t skip that step. I poured about a cup of cider into a small saucepan and let it simmer down until it had reduced to about a 1/3 cup. Not too difficult at all. I did these two ways: one half of the batch I just left plain, as that’s how Ashley likes them. The other half I dunked still warm into a cinnamon sugar mixture. The softness of the donuts combined with the subtle crunch of the sugar? Pure Heaven in my mouth, guys.

I’m taking these to this week’s Fiesta Friday #37, hosted by Angie@TheNoviceGardener and co-hosted this week by  Julianna @Foodie On Board and Hilda @Along The Grapevine. Cheers, guys.

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Apple Cider Donuts

Recipe Courtesy of Yankee Magazine

CLICK HERE FOR PRINTABLE VERSION

Ingredients

  • 1 cup granulated sugar
  • 5 tbsp unsalted butter, at room temperature
  • 2 large eggs, room temperature
  • 3-1/2 cups all-purpose flour, plus extra for work surface
  • 1-1/4 tsp. table salt
  • 2 tsp. baking powder
  • 1 tsp. baking soda
  • 1-1/2 tsp. ground cinnamon
  • 1/2 tsp. freshly grated nutmeg
  • 1/2 cup low-fat buttermilk
  • 1/3 cup boiled apple cider
  • 1 tbsp. vanilla extract
  • Canola or safflower oil (for frying)
  • Cinnamon sugar (1-1/2 cups sugar mixed with 3 tbsp. ground cinnamon) or confectioners’ sugar

 Directions

1. In a large bowl using a hand-held or standing mixer fitted with a whisk attachment, beat together sugar and butter until mixture is pale and fluffy, 4-6 minutes. Add eggs, one at a time, beating a minute after each. In a medium-size bowl, whisk together flour, salt, baking powder, baking soda, cinnamon, and nutmeg; set aside.

2. Pour buttermilk, boiled cider, and vanilla into sugar/butter/egg mixture. Mix well, and don’t worry if the mixture looks a bit curdled; it’ll smooth itself out. Add flour mixture and combine gently just until fully moistened.

3. Line two baking sheets with waxed paper or parchment paper and dust generously with flour. Turn dough out onto one baking sheet and pat gently into 3/4-inch-thickness. Sprinkle dough with additional flour, cover with plastic wrap, and place in the freezer for 10 minutes to firm up. Remove dough from the freezer; use a lightly floured 3-inch doughnut cutter (or two concentric biscuit cutters) to cut out about 18 doughnuts with holes. (You may gather the scraps and roll again as needed, but you may need to chill the dough more to firm it up.) Place cut doughnuts on the other baking sheet as you go; then transfer to the freezer for 5 minutes to firm up again.

4. Line a plate with a few layers of paper towels and set it nearby. In a Dutch oven or large pot, heat 3 inches of oil to 370° (test with an instant-read thermometer). Drop 3 or 4 doughnuts into the oil, being careful not to crowd the pan. Cook until browned on one side, about 1 minute; then flip and cook until browned on the other side, about 1 minute longer.

5. Repeat with the remaining dough (if you find that it’s getting too soft as you work your way through the batches, pop it into the freezer again for 10 minutes). When doughnuts are cool enough to handle but still warm, sprinkle all over or roll doughnuts in with cinnamon sugar or confectioners’ sugar. Serve immediately.

Bacon-Wrapped Blackberry Pork Roast

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Do you ever see something for the very first time, and immediately think: “I HAVE to have that”?

When I was little, I used to get that way about certain toys. There was this doll called Amazing Amy that came out in the 90’s that from the very first time I ever saw it, I knew I HAD to have it. She was this computerized doll that talked to you, telling you when she was hungry, thirsty, sick, sleepy, in need of a diaper change, or when she just wanted to change clothes. The doll came with a number of assort
ed foods/drinks, a medicine dropper,clothes and diapers, all fitted with computer chips. There were computer chips implanted in Amy’s mouth, back, and bottom so that when you gave her the food, changed her clothes or did ANYTHING to her, she would be able to identify what it was you were doing and tell you whether she liked it or not. It seems like a pretty basic toy now, but in the 90’s Amazing Amy was THE doll that I had been waiting for. Every time we went to the store, I wandered over to the toy section and gazed so longingly at that doll. It seemed like the coolest toy in the world. Did I need it? No. But I felt like I just HAD to have it. It took my mom a couple years to save the money (as it wasn’t very cheap), but she did finally buy it for us. Because she’s the best.

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Krispy Kreme opened a location in m hometown a few years back. From that very first day, I knew beyond any shadow of a doubt that I HAD to have a hot, freshly made Krispy Kreme doughnut. I.HAD.TO.

And I did. Actually, I had several. Every week.

The Krispy Kreme ended up closing, being put out of business by a chain of Tim Horton’s that simultaneously opened a few years afterward.

It was a messy end to the break up between me and those hot, perfect doughnuts. But it was for the best….at least that what my butt and thighs keep telling me.

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I was flipping through a Food Network Magazine a little while ago, when I suddenly came upon this recipe. It must have been some killer food photography, because the very first thought that entered my mind when I saw it was, “I HAVE to have that.”

Pork wrapped and roasted in more pork- and not just any pork: BACON?!

BAAAAACOOOOON.

I was making this dish. No ifs, ands or buts about it. I didn’t even do my traditional poll of the fam to see if they would eat it. There was no need for any of that. I knew they would.

We’re talking about bacon, here.

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I used a crappy knife to slice this roast, so I apologize for the sloppiness of the photos- but don’t let that throw you off. This dish was absolutely DELICIOUS. The marinade gives it a sweet/tangy flavor,while the bacon provides the perfect balance of saltiness, resulting in a perfect marriage of flavors. My instincts to make this couldn’t have been more spot on. It’s so good in fact, that I’ve decided to bring it to this week’s Fiesta Friday #36, hosted by Angie@TheNoviceGardener and co-hosted this week by Selma and Elaine.

What’s one thing that when you see you just HAVE to have?

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Bacon Wrapped Blackberry Pork Roast

Recipe Courtesy of Food Network Magazine

CLICK HERE FOR PRINTABLE VERSION

Ingredients

  • 1/4 cup blackberry preserves
  • 3 tablespoons white wine vinegar, or champagne vinegar
  • 2 tablespoons Dijon mustard
  • 2 teaspoons chopped fresh thyme
  • Kosher salt and freshly ground black pepper
  • 1 (4 to 5 lb) boneless center-cut pork loin, trimmed
  • 1 clove garli, smashed
  • 2 red onions, quartered
  • 8 slice bacon
  • 2 tablespoons instant flour (such as Wondra)
  • 3 cups low sodium chicken broth

 Directions

1. Combine the preserves, 1 tablespoon of vinegar, mustard, thyme and 1/2 teaspoon each salt and pepper in a small bowl.

2. Poke the pork with a paring knife, then rub with the garlic; season with salt and pepper.

3. Rub the pork all over with the preserves mixture, then transfer to a large resealable bag and refrigerate at least 2 hours, or overnight.

4. About 20 minutes before roasting, remove the pork from the fridge and preheat the oven to 325°. Put the red onions in a metal roasting pan and set a rack on top. Wrap the pork with the bacon (overlapping them slightly and tucking them under; tie a piece of kitchen twice around each slice to secure it). Set on the rack and roast until bacon is crisp and a thermometer inserted into center of pork reads 145°, about 1 1/2 hours. Transfer pork to a cutting board; let rest for 10 minutes.

5. Meanwhile, make gravy: Discard all but 2 tablespoons of the drippings from the pan.Place the roasting pan over 2 burners over medium-low heat and whisk in the flour until incorporated. Add the chicken broth and whisk until thickened, about 5 minutes. Add the remaining 2 tablespoons vinegar and season with salt & pepper.

6. Remove twine and slice the pork. Serve with onions and gravy.

Caramel Snickerdoodle Cake

Snickerdoodle Cake1

So today, I’d like to say a few things about September 27th.

(Yes, I’m aware that today is the 26th. I just don’t want to talk about the 26th. I want to talk about the 27th.)

On September 27th, 1779, John Adams formally negotiated the Revolutionary War peace terms with Great Britain.

On September 27th, 1821, the Mexican Empire formally announced independence.

On September 27th, 1908, Henry Ford’s first Ford Model T automobile was leaves the Piquette Plant in Detroit, Michigan.

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On September 27th, 1919, the Democratic National Committee voted to allow female voters.

On September 27th, 1954 “The Tonight Show” first premiered, hosted by Steven Allen.

On September 27th, 1983, basketball legend Larry Bird signed a seven-year contract with the Boston Celtics worth $15 million. The contract made him the highest paid Celtic in history.

Then, on September 27th, 1989 (9:01 a.m. to be exact)…something else happened.

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A baby girl was delivered by C-section in a hospital on a remote Army base in Montana. She was me.

So yeah, guys: tomorrow (September 27th) will be my 25th birthday. I’ve officially hit the middle of my twenties-five years past twenty…and five years away from being thirty. Ouch. Why does just typing that out make me feel old?

Birthdays haven’t been very much of a big deal to me for years. I’ve never actually had a birthday party. Most of them have either been spent at home while my mom or grandma made me a special dinner and cake, or in more recent years, out for a celebratory dinner at a restaurant. Not much of a big deal, which is fine with me. I’m a self-proclaimed introvert and I my social life is very private. I don’t need much of a fuss.

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This year however, was special in that, this was the first time that I’ve ever made me and Jas our own birthday cake. I’ll admit, the blog was a huge factor in pushing me to make that decision. I usually don’t make very many cakes in our house, but for some reason I just felt a necessity to bake a  really good birthday cake for a post. So after running several different ideas by Jas, I finally settled on this cake as one.  We both were very impressed with the result. Despite the title, I wouldn’t say that the flavor mimics a snickerdoodle cookie perfectly- however, you get a lot of the cinnamon, earthy and rich flavors that remind you of autumn baked goods. The texture is very moist and soft, thanks to the sour cream.The icing really sends the whole dish over the top- it’s good enough to eat off a spoon, no joke.

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I’d like to give a small shout out to my twin sister Jas real quick:

We made it to 25 years, chick. Thanks for being a pretty awesome ‘womb-mate’ for nine months, and an even greater roommate for the last 25. It’s been a great ride. You’re not just my twin sister- you’re the person who knows me the most in the entire world- both the good and bad. Happy Birthday. You know I love you.

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I’ll be taking this cake to this week’s Fiesta Friday #35, hosted by Angie@TheNoviceGardener and co-hosted this week by Prudy and Naina. Hope to see you all there 😉

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Caramel Snickerdoodle Cake

Recipe Adapted from Gold Medal Flour

CLICK HERE FOR PRINTABLE VERSION

Ingredients

  • 1 and 3/4 cups plus 2 tablespoons sugar
  • 2 teaspoons ground cinnamon
  • 2 1/2 cups all-purpose flour
  • 2 teaspoons baking soda
  • 1teaspoon salt
  • 1 can (5 oz) evaporated milk
  • 1 cup sour cream
  • 1/2 cup butter or margarine, melted
  • 1 teaspoon vanilla
  • 2 eggs, beaten

Cinnamon Icing

  • 1 1/2 cups powdered sugar
  • 1 tablespoon butter, melted
  • 1 tsp ground cinnamon
  • 2 tbsp. milk
  • 1/4 tsp vanilla extract

Directions

1. Heat oven to 350°F.

2. Grease 12-cup fluted tube cake pan with shortening. In small bowl, mix 2 tablespoons of the sugar and 1 teaspoon of the cinnamon. Sprinkle mixture over inside of pan, turning to evenly coat. Shake out any excess.

3. In large bowl, mix remaining 1 3/4 cups sugar, remaining 1 teaspoon cinnamon, the flour, baking soda and salt.

4. Stir remaining evaporated milk, sour cream, melted butter, vanilla and eggs into dry ingredients until well blended. Pour batter in pan.

5. Bake 40 to 50 minutes or until toothpick inserted in center comes out clean. Let stand 30 minutes; remove from pan. Cool completely, about 1 hour.

6. Combine all remaining ingredients. Add more powdered sugar or milk if need be to achieve correct consistency. Icing should be slightly thicker than a glaze, but not as thick as a frosting. Using offset spatula, spread icing over cooled cake. Allow to harden for about 30 minutes. Serve.