Cinnamon Cardamom Cake Donuts

I think that it’s pretty safe to say that all of us love donuts/doughnuts, right?

If you don’t then you may as well stop reading because this post (as well as next week’s) aren’t really for you. This is for all of us who love donuts/doughnuts.

Why did I give it two spellings? Is there a difference between donuts and doughnuts? I’m not sure if there’s an actual technical difference in the terms, but I do know how *I* personally distinguish the difference.

For me, it really just comes down to the method/ingredients. When I think of ‘Donuts’, I think about the method that does not include yeast. ‘Doughnuts’ do include the yeast in the dough. Don’t ask me why this is. Both donuts and doughnuts create ‘doughs’, but my mind just automatically associates the yeast with the ‘dough’, so there it is.

One big difference between donuts made without yeast and doughnuts that are made with yeast is the inner texture. The donuts made without yeast usually use baking powder/baking soda as their leavening and produce a denser, ‘cake-like’ texture. As a result, these are often called cake donuts. Donuts made with yeast have a lighter, airier texture.

A few weeks back, my niece was asking me if we could make doughnuts together. Because I like giving her what she wants and because it had been a while since I’d made doughnuts myself, I decided to make a day long project of it. She couldn’t decide which one she wanted, so we ended up making two different kinds–Cake Donuts AND Yeast Doughnuts. Cake Donuts will be today’s post. (Yeast Doughnuts will be next week’s, so stay tuned for that.)

Cake donuts are a tad bit easier than yeast doughnuts to make since you don’t have to worry about dealing with yeast and rising times. I already described the interior as dense and cakey, while the outside is rough and craggy–this is perfect for catching up whatever topping you choose to put on them, whether it’s icing or sugar. The dough itself for these is flavored with lemon and vanilla. The cinnamon sugar topping I flavored with both cinnamon and cardamom, just to give it an extra spicy note to complement the sweet. In short, these were great. The sugary topping gave a nice crunch to the soft inside and the flavors were spot on. I really wouldn’t change a thing.

Sharing at this week’s Fiesta Friday #235Fiesta Friday #235, co-hosted this week by Mara @ Put on Your Cake Pants and Hilda @ Along the Grapevine.

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Cinnamon Cardamom Cake Donuts

Recipe Courtesy of “Glazed, Filled, Sugared & Dipped” by Stephen Collucci

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Ingredients

For Donuts

  • 3 cups cake flour (all purpose flour will work as well)
  • 3/4 cup sugar
  • 1/2 teaspoon baking soda
  • 1 teaspoon baking powder
  • 1 1/2 teaspoon salt
  • Zest of half a lemon
  • 1 large egg, beaten
  • 1/2 cup buttermilk
  • 4 tablespoons (1/2 stick) unsalted butter, melted and cooled
  • 2 large egg yolks
  • 1 teaspoon vanilla extract

For Cinnamon Cardamom Sugar

  • 1/2 cup sugar
  • 1/2 teaspoon ground cinnamon
  • 1/4 teaspoon ground cardamom
  • 1/4 teaspoon salt

Directions

In a medium size bowl, combine the buttermilk, melted butter, egg yolks and vanilla extract with a fork. Set aside.

In the bowl of a standing mixer fitted with the paddle attachment, combine the flour, sugar, baking powder, baking soda, salt and lemon zest. Add the beaten egg and mix on low for a few seconds. Add the buttermilk mixture and mix until just combined into a stiffish dough.

Place a piece of parchment paper on clean work surface and sprinkle it with flour. Flour your hands or a spatula and scrape out the dough onto the piece of parchment paper. Flour a second sheet of parchment paper and place it on top of the top. Use a rolling pin to flatten it out until it’s 3/8 to 1/2 inch thick. Place the dough on a baking sheet and refrigerate it for 45 minutes to an hour (it’s ready when it no longer sticks to the parchment paper when you peel it away).

Towards the end of the refrigeration, heat 1 1/2-2 inches of oil in a heavy bottomed pot to 350°. Prepare 2 sheet pans; one lined with paper towels and the other with a piece of foil on the bottom and a baking rack on top. In a shallow dish, combine all the ingredients for the cinnamon cardamom sugar together with a fork. Keep the dish near your frying station.

Peel off the top sheet of parchment paper and flip the dough over onto your clean work surface that you’ve dusted with flour. Peel off the second sheet of parchment paper and sprinkle the dough with more flour. Flour your cookie/donut cutter and cut the dough into 2 1/2-3 inch rounds.

Fry the donuts in batches (don’t crowd the pot, no more than 3 at a time) until golden brown, 1-2 minutes per side. Drain on the paper towel lined baking sheet. While the donuts are still warm (but not piping hot) toss them in the cinnamon cardamom sugar and place them on the baking rack lined sheet pan. Eat immediately, or store for up to 2 days.

Old Fashioned Sour Cream Donuts

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I’d like to take this opportunity to drop a few nuggets of truth on all of you, if that’s okay.

Nobody is normal. Nobody.

Fears are nothing more than stories that we tell ourselves.

A person who is nice to you, but rude to the waiter, is not a nice person.

Nothing is really lost- until your mom can’t find it, that is. Then, it’s just gone forever.

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Lastly ( and perhaps most  importantly)…it is always, ALWAYS, a good ‘time to make the donuts’.

For those that may not know, the Dunkin’ Donuts company featured a commercial with a character named Fred the Baker who appeared in commercials with the trademark ‘catchphrase’: “Time to Make the Donuts”. It was a pretty popular ad, and was also parodied in one of my favorite Saturday Night Live sketches with Jon Lovitz. It’s really all I could think about when I was putting this post together, and I think that that really says something to the centrality of donuts in life in general. Think about it: there’s no time, event or circumstance when it’s not a good time for some donuts.

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Had a lousy day at work? Time to make/eat some donuts.

 Your favorite team won the game? Time to make/eat some donuts.

Fight with the spouse/significant other? Time to make/eat some donuts.

Payday? Time to make/eat some donuts.

Fiesta Friday? Definitely time to make/eat some donuts.

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I mentioned in some of my earlier posts that I recently got into the mood to make some donuts from scratch. My sisters wanted these Cinnamon Bun Doughnuts and Apple Cider Donuts. And me, well I wanted these.

A good old fashioned sour cream donut just like the ones you get from the bakery.

Guys. Guys, guys, guuuuuuuuys.

Drop whatever you’re doing, print out this recipe and get in your kitchen. ‘Cause it’s time to make the donuts. These donuts. Right now.

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This recipe is so good, I honestly wouldn’t be able to tell the difference between these donuts, and ones you would buy from a bakery. The dough creates the perfect browned, crusty crevices that have just enough body for the icing to seep into, solidify and form the most delightful pools of pure sugary goodness. It’s just what a sour cream donut should be, and I meant JUST: golden brown and crusty on the outside, soft and  flakey tender on the inside, with the sour cream giving it just enough of a subtle tang to complement the sweetness of the icing. One of the best donuts, I’ve ever had, hands down.

And yeah, I’m more than a little pleased and proud that I was the one to make them.

I’m bringing these donuts to this week;s Fiesta Friday #38 hosted by Angie@TheNoviceGardener and co-hosted this week by Hilda and Julianna. Don’t fight over  them all at once, guys. There’s plenty enough to go round-for now…

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Old Fashioned Sour Cream Donuts

Recipe Adapted from Completely Delicious via  Hand Forged Doughnuts

CLICK HERE FOR PRINTABLE VERSION

Old Fashioned Sour Cream Donuts

Ingredients

For Donuts

  • 2 1/4 cup (255 grams) cake flour
  • 1 1/2 teaspoon baking powder
  • 1 teaspoon salt
  • 1/2 teaspoon ground nutmeg
  • 1/2 cup (100 grams) sugar
  • 2 tablespoons butter flavored shortening
  • 2 large egg yolks
  • 1/2 cup (4 fluid ounces) sour cream
  • Canola oil, for frying

For Glaze

  • 3 1/2 cup (350 grams ) powdered sugar, sifted
  • 1 1/2 teaspoon corn syrup
  • 1/4 teaspoon salt
  • 1/2 teaspoon vanilla extract
  • 1/3 cup (2 1/2 fluid ounces) hot water

Directions

1. In a bowl, sift together the cake flour, baking powder, salt and nutmeg.

2. In the bowl of a stand mixer fitted with a paddle attachment, beat the shortening and sugar together until sandy. Add the egg yolks and mix until light and thick.

3. Add the dry ingredients to the mixing bowl in 3 additions, alternating with the sour cream, ending with the flour, scraping the sides of the bowl down as necessary. The dough will be sticky. Spoon it into a clean bowl, cover with plastic wrap and chill for 1 hour.

4. On a floured surface, roll out the chilled dough to about 1/2 inch thick. Use a donut cutter or two differently sized biscuit cutters to cut out as many donuts as possible, dipping the cutters into flour as necessary to prevent sticking.

5. Pour the canola oil into a heavy bottomed pot to at least 2 inches deep. Heat to 325 degrees F. Add the donuts to the heated oil a few at a time, careful not to overcrowd the pot. Fry on each side about 2 minutes, but watch to make sure they don’t burn.

6. Let drain on a paper bag to soak up the excess grease.

7. Mix all ingredients in a bowl with a whisk until smooth. Dip each donut into the glaze, making sure they are covered completely. Place on a wire rack above a sheet pan to catch any excess glaze. Let sit for 20 minutes until glaze is set.

8. Store in an air tight container at room temperature for a few days.

Apple Cider Donuts

Apple Cider Donuts1

Sometimes, I really miss being in the very early years of elementary school.

Morning and afternoon recess periods were awesome.

You can’t beat ‘homework’ that consisted of coloring in the lines and tracing out capital and lower case letters.

Sitting in a circle and singing with my classmates while my teacher played “The Farmer in the Dell” on the piano was cheesy, but still fun.

Yes, all of that was fine, but when I say I really miss those early years of school, I feel I should emphasize that what I really mean was that I miss the food part of it.

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I don’t know how it was for you guys, but at my elementary school,  there were certain foods that we all knew we could count on seeing and eating every season.  Because we all know that little kids can be placated and satisfied with treats.

Actually you can still kinda say that about me now. But I digress.

At Christmas, we were given candy canes and frosted cookies. Valentines Day meant we always held class valentine and candy exchanges. Around St. Patrick’s Day we got pancakes dyed with green food coloring. And at this time of year, we knew that we were gonna go on a field trip to a real life apple orchard, and ultimately end up eating apple cider and donuts. I gotta say, of all the food ‘holidays’ we had, the Apple Cider and Donuts holiday was my favorite.

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I got it into my head a little while ago that I really wanted to make donuts from scratch. Like really, really, REALLY wanted to. I took my usual poll of the family to see what they wanted. Jas wanted a cinnamon bun-style doughnut, which resulted in these absolutely heavenly Cinnamon Roll Doughnuts. Ashley (our resident apple cider addict) wanted Apple Cider Donuts. And me- well, we’ll get to that in a later post. For now, let’s just focus on these.

I had a cut out recipe from Yankee Magazine that I really wanted to try and looked easy enough for someone like me who’s never made her own donuts from scratch before. At first after rolling and cutting out the dough, I was skeptical that I had done it wrong as the dough didn’t seem thick enough to give me the thick, fluffy cake donuts that I had originally wanted to make. However, once these babies hit the hot oil in the deep fryer, they puffed ALLLLLLL the way up. The intense apple flavor of these is really just amazing, and I do think that it was due to the concentrated flavor that came from the boiled cider, so don’t skip that step. I poured about a cup of cider into a small saucepan and let it simmer down until it had reduced to about a 1/3 cup. Not too difficult at all. I did these two ways: one half of the batch I just left plain, as that’s how Ashley likes them. The other half I dunked still warm into a cinnamon sugar mixture. The softness of the donuts combined with the subtle crunch of the sugar? Pure Heaven in my mouth, guys.

I’m taking these to this week’s Fiesta Friday #37, hosted by Angie@TheNoviceGardener and co-hosted this week by  Julianna @Foodie On Board and Hilda @Along The Grapevine. Cheers, guys.

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Apple Cider Donuts

Recipe Courtesy of Yankee Magazine

CLICK HERE FOR PRINTABLE VERSION

Ingredients

  • 1 cup granulated sugar
  • 5 tbsp unsalted butter, at room temperature
  • 2 large eggs, room temperature
  • 3-1/2 cups all-purpose flour, plus extra for work surface
  • 1-1/4 tsp. table salt
  • 2 tsp. baking powder
  • 1 tsp. baking soda
  • 1-1/2 tsp. ground cinnamon
  • 1/2 tsp. freshly grated nutmeg
  • 1/2 cup low-fat buttermilk
  • 1/3 cup boiled apple cider
  • 1 tbsp. vanilla extract
  • Canola or safflower oil (for frying)
  • Cinnamon sugar (1-1/2 cups sugar mixed with 3 tbsp. ground cinnamon) or confectioners’ sugar

 Directions

1. In a large bowl using a hand-held or standing mixer fitted with a whisk attachment, beat together sugar and butter until mixture is pale and fluffy, 4-6 minutes. Add eggs, one at a time, beating a minute after each. In a medium-size bowl, whisk together flour, salt, baking powder, baking soda, cinnamon, and nutmeg; set aside.

2. Pour buttermilk, boiled cider, and vanilla into sugar/butter/egg mixture. Mix well, and don’t worry if the mixture looks a bit curdled; it’ll smooth itself out. Add flour mixture and combine gently just until fully moistened.

3. Line two baking sheets with waxed paper or parchment paper and dust generously with flour. Turn dough out onto one baking sheet and pat gently into 3/4-inch-thickness. Sprinkle dough with additional flour, cover with plastic wrap, and place in the freezer for 10 minutes to firm up. Remove dough from the freezer; use a lightly floured 3-inch doughnut cutter (or two concentric biscuit cutters) to cut out about 18 doughnuts with holes. (You may gather the scraps and roll again as needed, but you may need to chill the dough more to firm it up.) Place cut doughnuts on the other baking sheet as you go; then transfer to the freezer for 5 minutes to firm up again.

4. Line a plate with a few layers of paper towels and set it nearby. In a Dutch oven or large pot, heat 3 inches of oil to 370° (test with an instant-read thermometer). Drop 3 or 4 doughnuts into the oil, being careful not to crowd the pan. Cook until browned on one side, about 1 minute; then flip and cook until browned on the other side, about 1 minute longer.

5. Repeat with the remaining dough (if you find that it’s getting too soft as you work your way through the batches, pop it into the freezer again for 10 minutes). When doughnuts are cool enough to handle but still warm, sprinkle all over or roll doughnuts in with cinnamon sugar or confectioners’ sugar. Serve immediately.