Corn Bubble Bread

I love going to discount/used bookstores. When I younger, my mom would take us downtown for weekly trips to the public library and there was a discount bookstore in the basement called The Book Burrow where you could buy books for literal pocket change. It was a dim place with exposed water/gas pipes, stained ceilings, and flickering lights. It had the unmistakable ‘old book smell’ that I will never forget.

And I loved going. LOVED it.

This was in a time when dial-up internet was still a thing, and the Google we know now really…wasn’t. (Shout out to the people who still remember what Netscape Navigator was) We didn’t have access to either. So if I had a school assignment that required some outside research, pictures or info my mom would just take us to the public library to either check out books or to the Book Burrow to buy cheap cooks or old National Geographic issues. The YA section was filled with towers of books, mostly different series like Sweet Valley High, which I loved. (Give me a break; I was a 90’s kid and an identical twin named Jessica at that.) I could, and sometimes did, stay in that corner reading and picking out books to buy for hours.

Those memories I have of hte Book Burrow have carried over into my adulthood to where I still love going to discount/used bookstores. Of course now I’m not looking for a book on Zambia for my 5th grade presentation project. I’ve also put my Sweet Valley High phase behind me–I’m actually trying to forget it ever happened. Nowadays when I stop and look in a discount bookstore, I will go straight to one section.

I bet y’all can guess which one it is.

The particularly great thing about the cookbook section of a discount section is that most of the books in it are going to be very old; some maybe even vintage. If you’re VERY lucky you can find the ‘Church cookbooks’ that are literally collated recipes from elderly church ladies (mostly Southern) that share the foods they make for their families and church potlucks. I’ve also seen huge, thick baking books with hundreds of recipes int hem that would normally be thirty or forty dollars, only cost as little as five in a discount bookstore.

It’s ridiculous how excited I get when I come across a find like that.

I was downtown a while ago and lo and behold: there was a discount bookstore adjoining the parking garage I was parked in. The cookbook section was right smack dab in the front window, guys.

Do you REALLY think I could just walk by without even going in to look? Tuh. Remember I said you could find those thick baking collection books for practically pennies? I found one at that discount bookstore in the parking garage. It was one of the first ones I picked up and as soon as I saw it, I knew it was mine. I flipped through the pages on the way home, already excited to test one of the recipes out.

This recipe in its original form needed some adjustments. But once I made them, it resulted in a super tasty loaf. We’ve already established that I will legit look for a way to throw some cornmeal into ANYTHING and this was a very good something to throw it in. I thought the construction was not only simple, but pretty to look at it. The shape is made by layering balls of the dough on top of one another in a tube pan so that when it bakes, it forms ‘bubbles’ across the top. You can use the bubbles to tear off chunks of the bread, or cut it into thick slices like I did.

The loaf itself is soft, though the cornmeal gives it a gritty texture and sweetness that I personally love. It’s delicious smeared with jelly and butter, but I think it’d be excellent as the base for French toast as well. If you don’t have a tube pan, this would work just fine in loaf pans and cake pans too.

So, what have we learned? #1, don’t sleep on discount bookstores. They’re lit. #2 You should make this bread. That’s all… for today anyway.

Linking this up to Fiesta Friday #199, co-hosted this week by  Judi @ cookingwithauntjuju.com and Mollie @ The Frugal Hausfrau.

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Corn Bubble Bread

Recipe Adapted from “Bernard Clayton’s New Complete Book of Breads”

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Ingredients

  • 3-5 cups bread flour, divided
  • 2 tablespoons of sugar, divided
  • 1 tablespoon seasoning salt
  • 1 teaspoon black pepper
  • 1 cup yellow cornmeal
  • 2 packages/envelopes active dry yeast
  • 1 1/2 cups warm water
  • 1/2 cup milk
  • 2 tablespoons shortening
  • 1 egg, beaten

Directions

In a large bowl of a standing mixer, combine 2 cups of the flour, 1 tablespoon of sugar, the salt, pepper and cornmeal. Stir together to combine, then set aside.

In a small saucepan combine the warm water, milk and shortening. Allow to heat over the stove until warm to the touch. (Around 120-130 degrees Fahrenheit)  Sprinkle the yeast on top, then sprinkle the remaining 1 tablespoon of white sugar on top of that. Allow yeast to proof, about 10 minutes until frothy on top.

Pour the yeast mixture into the dry ingredients and use the dough hook to beat at medium speed for about 2 minutes. Add an additional cup of flour to the dough to thicken it and continue to beat at medium high speed. Turn mixer off, then add additional flour as needed to where it is a rough mass that can be worked with your hands.

Sprinkle a clean surface with flour, then turn dough out onto it. Knead with a strong push-pull action, about 8 minutes. Place back in the mixer and knead for an additional 8 minutes. It should feel smooth and elastic, and spring back under the touch.

Grease the mixing bowl, then place the dough inside. Cover with plastic wrap, then a damp kitchen towel. Allow to proof until doubled in size, about 1 1/2- 2 hours.

Grease one 10” tube pan. Sprinkle your work surface with flour and turn dough out onto it. Punch dough down a few times to deflate air bubbles. Use a bench scraper or a sharp knife to divide into 32 equal pieces; first 2, then 4, then 8, then 16, then 32. Roll each of the 32 pieces into balls, then arrange the balls into 2 layers in the bottom of the tube pan. Cover with plastic wrap, then a damp kitchen towel. Allow to proof until doubled in size, about 1 1/2- 2 hours.

Preheat oven to 375°. Beat the egg in a small bowl with a fork. Brush over the top of the dough balls. Place the tub pan on a half sheet pan, then bake in the oven until golden brown and hollow on the bottom, about 40-45 minutes. (It browns/bakes fast, so check it early and cover if browning too quickly. Bread is done at 190° inner temp.) Allow to cool for about 15 minutes on a wire rack.

Honey Cornbread Crackers

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Sometimes in life, the timing is just off. Sometimes in the kitchen, the timing is just off.  If I had to give this post a theme, I think it would be timing. Timing that was…off.  Why?

Well, you guys remember when I first started making and sharing recipes for DIY crackers, right? I began with the Curry and Ginger crackers, kept it going with the Pumpkin Cinnamon and a little while after that did Cinnamon Sugar ones. For a while, I went on a cracker making spree. It was a tasty little expedition.

I’m a little embarrassed to admit that this post has just been sitting in my drafts folder since mid-January. I had actually tested out one additional recipe with all of the other ones, but I never got around to posting it. I really don’t have a good excuse; it always just seemed like the timing to post it was off. I would have another recipe that I thought needed to come first, then it seemed like it was the wrong season/time of year, at one point I hated the pictures, then I didn’t hate the pictures anymore but I still thought the timing was off, then I hated the pictures again, then I didn’t think anyone would care to read about yet ANOTHER cracker recipe. Yada yada yada.

Excuses. Y’all get it.

Today is a rare day where I DO think the timing/time of year for this recipe is right, I don’t hate the pictures, and I do think this recipe should generate some interest. So while that perfect harmony still exists, I’m finally booting this post out of my drafts folder and onto the blog for all to see. My fourth cracker recipe, though probably not the last. It’s eight months late, but eh… better late than never.

What do you guys like to eat alongside your chili? For most people, it’s a hunk of cornbread. For others, maybe it’s crackers; y’know, those oyster shaped ones that come in the sealed packages. I’m good with both, although I’m a bit more partial to the cornbread. Fortunately with this recipe, you really wouldn’t need to pick as it’s a combination of the two.

A while ago Townhouse had a line of crackers that they put on what they called a ‘Bistro’ line. They came in flavors of Multi-grain and Cornbread. The multi-grain was tasty but the Cornbread ones? Guys. They were SOOOO good. I could go through an embarrassing amount of them in one sitting, so perhaps it was for the best that they were discontinued, but I still feel a way about it. Although now, I don’t suppose it matters because I’m pleased to announce that these really do taste almost identical.

The texture of these is different and, I think, better than a standard oyster/saltine cracker. They’re a bit thicker. The cornmeal gives them a gritty, sturdy coarser texture. The honey makes them slightly sweet. I really do have to say, they taste like cornbread would if it were put into a crisp cracker. They were yummy enough for me to just eat them completely solo as snacks, but I can think of several other uses for them.

Cheese lovers should know that these are perfect for eating with cheese. They would be delicious crumbled or dipped into guacamole or bean dip. Tomato soup would complement them very nicely. And  yes, of COURSE, you should eat them alongside or dipped in your chili.

Aren’t y’all glad I decided to finally share? Be easy.

Sharing at this week’s Fiesta Friday #191, co-hosted this week by Judi @ cookingwithauntjuju.com and Antonia @ Zoale.com.

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Honey Cornbread Crackers

Recipe Adapted from Bob’s Red Mill Baking Book

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Ingredients

  • 6 oz all-purpose flour (a little over 1 cup)
  • 4 oz yellow cornmeal (about 1 cup)
  • 1 tablespoon sugar
  • 1 tablespoon dry powdered milk
  • ½ teaspoon kosher salt, plus more for sprinkling
  • 1 teaspoon baking powder
  • ½ teaspoon baking soda
  • 4 tablespoons cold butter (cut into 8 pieces)
  • ¼ cup honey
  • 1/3 cup whole milk

 

Directions

Preheat oven to 325 degrees Fahrenheit.

In a medium size bowl combine the flour, cornmeal, sugr, dry milk, kosher salt, baking powder, and baking soda until well blended.

Cut the butter into the dry mixture with a pastry blender, a fork or two knives. The mixture should look like fine crumbs.

In a small bowl combine the honey with the milk, then pour this mixture into the butter/dry ingredients. Stir until you have a smooth dough that doesn’t stick to the bowl. (Drizzle in additional milk if too dry/crumbly).

Divide the dough in half. Sprinkle some flour on a clean, flat surface. Using a well floured rolling pin, Roll out the dough half to about 1/16th inch. From here, cut the dough into whatever desired shapes you want using cookie cutters, pizza wheel, bench scraper or a knife.

Line two baking sheets with parchment paper. Place the cut cracker dough onto the sheets and freeze for about 20 minutes.

Using a fork, prick the surface of the cracker dough evenly. Spray the tops with cooking spray, then sprinkle with salt.

Bake for 12-16 minutes until golden brown at the edges. Allow to cool for about 60 seconds on the baking sheet before removing to wire racks to cool completely.

Sweet Cornmeal Scones

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Smoked paprika. Onion powder. Worcestershire sauce.  Hoisin sauce. Onion soup mix.

This seems like a random list, I know. But in my private little world of cooking and baking, it totally makes sense.

There are certain ingredients that I have a slight obsession with. If you’re a cook, you’ll know what I mean. No matter what, you always have to have them in your house/kitchen. You search for excuses to put them to use. You’ll swap them in recipes that don’t necessarily call for them, because YOU know from experience that they serve their own unique purpose. I’ve certainly found that to be the case for me with the above mentioned ingredients.

I used to think paprika was pointless. It gave dishes a reddish hue but I never could distinguish a prominent flavor in regular paprika. I still can’t. But the day I discovered smoked paprika? Whooooo. I was hooked. The earthy smokiness is a flavor that will work with just about ANY savory dish, especially Latin and Middle Eastern ones. I freely admit to dumping entire tablespoonfuls of smoked paprika in braises and spice rubs. The tastebuds of the people I’m feeding always thank me later–and if you start using it generously in your food I promise that the tastebuds of the people you feed will thank you as well.

I’m gonna keep it 100 with you guys: I depend on onion powder in seasoning my food even more than I do salt and pepper. Yes. It’s that serious. I’m really sitting here trying to think if there is ANY savory dish that I make where I don’t use onion powder…….yeah, no. There’s not, and that’s because onion powder makes everything taste better. Worcestershire sauce and Hoisin sauce kinda go hand in hand. If you’re making a beef or pork dish and you want to add a deeper, richer layer of flavor to your sauce, then I highly recommend you keep them handy. A tablespoon of hoisin  and few shakes of Worcestershire sauce in a beef stew will REALLY give it that extra boost: trust me on this. lastly, If you think you’re really bad at making gravy–or you’re not bad at it, but you need to make some fast in a pinch, then using dry onion soup mix combined with beef broth is a quick & easy way to get good results.

I left one ingredient off that list on purpose, because it’s largely centered on today’s recipe.  Here’s the thing, guys: I have a slight obsession with cornmeal. I love it. I search for ways to put the stuff in everything, in both sweet and savory applications. I’ve shared two cornbread recipes on the blog already (my grandma’s recipe included which is made of more cornmeal than flour). The fried chicken recipe I shared a few weeks ago was posted alongside a recipe for biscuits that had cornmeal in them. I’ve made several yeast breads that have cornmeal in the dough–heck, I just made one yesterday that I’ll be sharing soon. There’s even a cookie recipe I tried with cornmeal that I really liked. I even sometimes put a sprinkle of cornmeal in my stews, chilis or braises to both thicken the liquid, and give it a subtle corny flavor.

And now, just when you thought there couldn’t possibly be yet another cornmeal recipe I could throw at y’all, here I am… throwing another cornmeal recipe at you.

You only have to take a brief glance at the Recipe Index to figure out that I’m kinda fond of scones.Every so often I get a crazy craving for one that I just have to appease, whether it means finding a coffee shop with a good selection or just making them myself. This time, I went with the latter and decided to see what would happen if I made my favored breakfast pastry with one of my favored ingredients.

This is what happened, and I gotta say: I like it. Cornmeal does admittedly add a coarser, grittier texture to ANY dough you make so if you’re searching for a light and fluffy scone, this may not be the one for you. However, these still do have layers and a flakiness to them that I think the cornmeal adds an interesting and different texture to. They’re somehow flaky and bready at the same time. Flavor-wise, you taste the sweetness from the light brown sugar then the subtle sweetness of the corn-y flavor and somehow, the two just really work together. Oh, and did I mention these were made even better smeared with butter and jam? Cause they were.

Sharing at Fiesta Friday #184, co-hosted this week by Petra @ Food Eat Love and Jhuls @ The Not So Creative Cook.

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Sweet Cornmeal Scones

Recipe Adapted from Food.com

Ingredients

  • 2 cups all purpose flour
  • 1/3 cup yellow cornmeal
  • 1/2 teaspoon salt
  • 1 teaspoon baking powder
  • 1/2 teaspoon baking soda
  • 1/4 cup light brown sugar
  • 1/2 cup unsalted butter, frozen, plus more for brushing
  • 3/4 cup buttermilk, plus more as needed
  • Turbinado sugar for sprinkling, optional

 

Directions

Preheat the oven to 400°. In a large bowl, combine the flour, cornmeal salt, baking powder, baking soda and brown sugar with a fork.

Using the large holes on a box grater, grate the butter into the dry ingredients and stir a few times to combine. Make a well in the center of the bowl.

Pour the buttermilk into the well and use a large rubber spatula to stir the mixture together. If it seems a little dry you may add additional buttermilk until it forms a shaggy dough.

Sprinkle a pastry mat, wooden cutting board or wax paper with flour. Turn the dough out onto the surface and pat a few times with your hands until it loosely holds together. (Don’t knead it too much or the warmth in your palms will melt the butter and cause the scones to be tough.)

Pat and roll the dough into a rectangle. Take the two opposite ends and fold them together like a business letter into thirds. Flip it upside down and pat & roll it into another rectangle, sprinkling the surface with flour if it gets too sticky. Repeat the folding process two to three more times before patting it into one final rectangle.

Use a bench scraper or very sharp knife to divide the rectangle in half, then divide the halves into thirds or fourths squares (depending on what size scones you want).

Line a sheet pan with parchment paper and place the cut scones on it. Freeze them for about 30 minutes. In the meantime, fill a shallow pan with water and place it on the bottom rack of the oven.

Brush the scones with melted butter and the turbinado sugar, then bake in the oven on the middle rack for about 15-20 minutes, until they’re golden brown on top. Remove from oven to a wire rack. Serve warm, spread with butter or jam.

 

Cornflower Yeast Rolls

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Fear not: I come bearing carbs.

Plenty of carbs. Plenty of pretty carbs, at that.

For some of you that alone is enough to get your attention., amiright?

On the day that I made this particular batch of bread, I was on my own in the house and had a little bit more time than usual, so I decided I would play around a little bit with the dough. I doubled the below recipe and tested out 3 random, different shapes I’d been running through my mind lately to try out. I decided that whichever one turned out the prettiest, I would feature on the blog and tell you guys how to pull off yourselves.

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Well, the results are in. The first option was a Deep Cross Roll; I made individual balls of dough, cut deeply into them with a sharp knife with the intention that they would look like an inverted Hot Cross Bun without the white piped cross. (Fyi, it totally didn’t work, though I swear that it all made sense in my head at the time).

The second idea was for intricately woven cornmeal wreaths. These actually weren’t a complete flop. They did very strongly resemble wreaths, but I noticed that there was inconsistent proofing in the second rise so that some halves of the wreaths were bigger than the other half, which looked…weird and misshapen and not something I could manage to look pretty in a picture. Moving on.

Cornflower Yeast Rolls3

The third time really is the charm. My last idea was to take a technique similar to the one I’d done with the Pane di Pasqua I made for Easter, then do a little extra tucking and braiding to manipulate the individual bread rolls to resemble a kind of flower. It worked. Very well. I was a little concerned that they would go the way of their predecessors and resembled big indiscernible blobs of bread after baking, but t’was not the case.  These rolls proofed beautifully on the second rise and once they hit the hot oven, puffed up even more so that by the time they’re all finished they really DO look like complicated flowers of dough. The truth is, the technique is almost stupid easy so you get bragging rights on these without the extra drama that goes with complex baking projects.

Cornflower Yeast Rolls6

I tweaked the original concept for the recipe to what I think, are much better results. In the first place I kept with the new practice I’ve started of adding a single cup of whole wheat flour to my bread doughs in general. Guys, you really wouldn’t believe the difference this makes. As someone who prefers whole wheat bread, I certainly appreciate the addition of the whole wheat flour. Yet, even those who usually prefer white bread I think will STILL appreciate the subtle nutty flavor that it gives to the dough. What you get when you combine that nuttiness with the flavor of the cornmeal is something that has to be tried to be fully appreciated. The bread’s texture is soft and pillowy with just the right amount of chew.

Cornflower Yeast Rolls2

Don’t be intimidated by the shaping part of the dough. I know it may look fancy and complicated, but it isn’t. If you can wind two pieces of ribbon together, (loosely at that) then trust me: you can make these rolls. Seriously. Also don’t be worried if directly after you finish shaping them, they don’t look quite discernible as flowers. The second proofing and the baking in the oven will do the bulk of that work for you.

So, do these look similar to the actual blue cornflower flower? No. But I’m still going ahead and calling these Cornflower Yeast Rolls in a nod to that cornmeal flavor in the dough combined with the shape that I gave to them. KooKoo kachoo.

Taking myself and these rolls to this week’s Fiesta Friday #129, co-hosted this week by Jhuls @ The Not So Creative Cook and Colleen @ Faith, Hope, Love & Luck.

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Cornflower Yeast Rolls

Recipe Adapted from FoodNetwork.com

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Ingredients

  • 2 cups milk
  • 1/2 cup cornmeal, plus more for dusting
  • 1/2 cup butter or margarine
  • 1/2 cup sugar, plus 1 tsp, divided
  • 2 teaspoons salt
  • 1/2 cup water
  • 2 teaspoons active dry yeast
  • 1/2 cup warm water
  • 2 eggs, well-beaten, plus one egg, divided.
  • 1 cup whole wheat flour
  • 3 to 5 cups all purpose white flour, as needed

Directions

Combine the milk, cornmeal, butter or margarine, 1/2 cup sugar, and salt in medium saucepan. Warm over medium heat, stirring with a wooden spoon and allowing to cook until the mixture if slightly thickened. Add 1/2 cup water and mix well. Set aside to cool.

Soften active dry yeast in warm water (110 degrees F). Sprinkle the 1 tsp of sugar on top and allow to sit for 10 minutes or until yeast is frothy.

Combine cornmeal mixture, yeast, and 2 well-beaten eggs together in the bowl of a standing mixer, using the paddle attachment to combine together.

Then, using the dough hook attachment, add the cup of whole wheat  first, mixing to combine completely.  Add enough of the all purpose white flour to make a soft dough. It should be a smooth,pliable dough that no longer sticks to the sides of the bowl, but also not too dry.

Place the dough in another greased bowl, turning once to grease surface. Cover with a layer of plastic wrap, then a damp kitchen towel. Place in a warm place for about an hour.

When dough has doubled in size, remove from bowl and divide in half. Dive the halves in half.

Pinch off two dough balls about the size of ping pong balls and roll/shape them into logs. Pinch the top ends of both logs together, then braid them together.(This is going to take some patience. Have a small cup of water handy just in case your dough loses its moistness–it’s easier to roll out when it stays moist.Dip your fingers in the cup of water and rub a little bit of the water over the dough balls before you roll them out. Also, don’t worry about it if the ropes shrink a little bit after you roll them out; it’s not that big of a deal.)

Once the logs are braided, take the bottom end and roll it up (like a spring or a wheel), pinching the bottom end into the top one and tucking it under. Repeat with the remaining dough, placing the finished ‘flowers’ on a baking sheet lined with parchment paper.

Cover the finished flowers with plastic wrap, then a damp kitchen towel. Let rise in warm place or until doubled in size, about 1 hour.

Preheat the oven to 375 degrees F. Take the remaining egg and beat it in a small bowl with about a tablespoon of water. Brush the beaten egg over the proofed rolls and sprinkled with cornmeal.

 Bake rolls for 12 to 15 minutes.

Iced Cornmeal Cookies

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Have you ever really wanted to try something, but you kept putting it off because you just weren’t sure if it would actually work?

I have. In fact, as a naturally cautious (if not downright paranoid person) this tends to happen to me a lot.

I have had I don’t know how many tv shows in my Netflix Instant queue for months. I put them there because I initially thought that they sounded interesting and wanted to give them a shot to see if I would like the show. But then, I never start watching them, because I’m juuuuuust not sure if the shows would be something that I liked. I mean, once they’re gone, I can never get those 45 minutes of my life back.

Iced Cornmeal Cookies2

I’ve got one loooooooong Amazon wishlist, full of things that I want, but have yet to actually order.

But this one may be less about my being paranoid and cautious, and more about me being broke 9 times out of 10.

As it turns out, most of the time, when I’m overly cautious about trying something new, it usually has to do with food. I’m NOTORIOUSLY picky/cautious when it comes to my food.

Iced Cornmeal Cookies3

I’m “that person” who only ever orders ONE thing off the menu of a restaurant or take out place. I’m far too paranoid that the one time I decide to be ‘bold’ and ‘daring’, and order something new, it’ll blow up in my face and I’ll absolutely hate it. So not only will I have wasted my money, but I’ll also have to choke down food that I don’t even like, resulting in an unsatisfying meal- which is one of my BIGGEST pet peeves.

I don’t even like straying from the script when it comes to my coffee.

My general philosophy with food is, if it ain’t broke, then I sure ain’t gonna try to fix it.

Iced Cornmeal Cookies4

But sometimes, I break character and try to eat and cook new foods.

It turns out that having a food blog will give you a rather sizable boot in the rear, so far as that goes.

As a result, I have a full Pinterest board of recipes from other blogs and websites of foods that really caught my attention and made me want to try out for myself. Today’s recipe was one of them; it’s been there for over a year at least.

See? I told you I was overly cautious.

The most intriguing element to this recipe for me was the inclusion of cornmeal in the cookie dough. I was just wildly curious as to what that would taste like; I had SO many questions.

Would the cookies be sweet? Would the texture be too rough/coarse because of the cornmeal? Would they be soft or crunchy? Would they even taste good at all?

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For my own personal preferences, I decided to bake the cookies for as little time as possible so that they would be soft. I assumed by the smell and taste of the raw dough (yes, I eat raw cookie dough. Don’t judge me) that they would be similar to sugar cookies. And I insist upon having my sugar cookies iced. So I then whipped up a quick and easy icing to spread on top and added nonpareils for color.

The finished product?

Well first of all, they’re very good. So that was a huge relief.

Second, I can honestly say that I’ve never had cookies like these before ;the cornmeal is really the star ingredient here. It gives the cookies such a unique texture and flavor. Although I went with vanilla extract and icing, I could see citrus zest like lemon or orange working VERY well with these.

All in all, my risk taking paid off. Which made me a very happy camper 🙂

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Iced Cornmeal Cookies

Recipe Adapted from Martha Stewart

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Ingredients

  • 1 1/2 cups all-purpose flour (spooned and leveled), plus more for shaping
  • 1/2 cup yellow cornmeal
  • 1/2 teaspoon salt
  • 3/4 cup (1 1/2 sticks) unsalted butter, room temperature
  • 3/4 cup sugar
  • 1 large egg
  • 1 teaspoon pure vanilla extract

For Icing

  • 2 cups powdered sugar
  • A few tablespoons of milk
  • 2 tsp. light corn syrup
  • multi-colored nonpareils, optional

Directions

Preheat oven to 350 degrees. In a medium bowl, whisk together flour, cornmeal, and salt; set aside.

In a large bowl, using an electric mixer, beat butter and sugar until light and fluffy. Add egg and vanilla; beat until smooth. With mixer on low, gradually add flour mixture, mixing just until combined.

Drop dough by heaping tablespoons, about 2 inches apart, onto two large baking sheets; flatten slightly with floured fingertips. Bake until edges are golden, 14 to 16 minutes, rotating sheets halfway through. Transfer cookies immediately to a wire rack; let cool completely.

For Icing: combine the first 3 ingredients until smooth. Spread over cooled cookies, then decorate with nonpareil sprinkles. Allow icing to harden, about 30 minutes.

My Grandma’s Cornbread

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There’s  a great and mighty war being fought in the United States right now.

No, not that one.

Nope, not that one either.

This one is about something different, something very complicated. The two sides have grappled, struggled and fought with each other for decades, maybe even over a hundred years. They just can’t reach an agreement over the issue at stake- not even a compromise. There’s no end in sight for this war. It could just go on forever.

You know what war I’m talking about, right?

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The Cornbread War.

I’m serious, guys. No, really. I am.

Here’s the thing: there are typically 2 types of corn breads made in the US. The first type is thought of as ‘Northern’ cornbread; it’s made with a majority of flour with a small portion of cornmeal added to the batter so that it’s moist, soft and almost cakey in texture. It’s also pretty sweet. Then there’s ‘Southern’cornbread: this batter is almost completely cornmeal with just a little bit of flour added to it. The texture is therefore coarser and almost crumbly. It’s hardly ever sweet and in most cases, is actually on the salty side.

People who prefer Northern cornbread are adamant that theirs is better. Southern cornbread lovers are of the general opinion that their cornbread IS cornbread. Anything else is just an imposter.

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Personally I have to admit: I am usually willing to be on either of the ‘sides’ in the Cornbread War. Both taste fine to me. However, I will say this: given the choice, any day, I will always always ALWAYS pick my Grandma’s cornbread.

And mu grandma’s cornbread is Southern to a T.

This is a recipe I’ve wanted to share on the blog for a while. It’s very important to our family, as this is something that I’ve literally been eating all my life. Hopefully I’ll be eating it right up to the day I die.  I can cook some pretty fancy stuff if I wanted to, but a hunk of this cornbread served with a big bowl of my grandma’s collard greens are really all I need for a satisfying meal. She’s made this bread so many times, she doesn’t even need to measure out the ingredients; she literally just pours them into a bowl, mixes it up and bakes it off without even paying that much attention.

And it still comes out perfect every time.

Grandmas Cornbread5

I wouldn’t share this recipe for anything less than a special occasion and today is certainly a VERY special occasion as it happens to be the One Year Anniversary of Fiesta Friday at The Novice Gardener. A great big HUGE congratulations to Angie on reaching this milestone- thanks for gathering together so many talented bloggers and letting them share all of their wonderful creations week after week at the parties. I also have to throw out a thank you to Nancy@FeastingwithFriends for being the one who first introduced me to the Fiesta Friday link up in the first place- I’m so glad she did. Let’s keep it rockin on, guys.

The Part 1 of our Anniversary party at the Fiesta is being hosted this week by  Hilda @Along The Grapevine and Julianna @Foodie On Board. Make sure you come on out and join us!

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My Grandma's Cornbread

Recipe Courtesy of Jess@CookingisMySport

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Ingredients

  • 2 1/2 cups yellow cornmeal
  • 1/2 cup all purpose flour
  • 1 1/2 tbsp. baking powder
  • 1 large egg, beaten well
  • 2 tbsp. sugar
  • 2 tbsp. liquid bacon grease/drippings
  • 1/4 cup butter, melted
  • 1 tsp. salt
  • About 1 cup of Milk (or as much as necessary)

Directions

1. Preheat oven to 400°. Spray an 8-inch square pan (or a cast iron skillet) with cooking spray.

2. Combine all of the ingredients in a bowl, adding the milk in small increments– the batter should be thick, but not so stiff that it can’t be poured out.

3. Bake in the oven for 20-25 minutes, or until a toothpick comes out clean when inserted in the middle.

Hushpuppies

Hushpuppies1

Guys, guess what?

I just got a new computer. After four years, my old Acer finally had to buy the farm. See what had happened was, the power cord jack has been increasingly wearing out to the point where the cord couldn’t stay inside of it by itself.Because new laptops are expensive (and because I’m cheap) I put up with it for a while, just not plugging it in until I needed to, then being sure not to move the laptop too much (or so much as a inch at times). It was super annoying, but I still roughed it out.

But last week, I had myself a little scare. I needed to charge my laptop, so I plugged it in….and nothing happened. It didn’t pick up the signal from the wall charger. And my battery was running low.

Did I mention that all of my photos, documents, programs from the last five years are stored on my Acer laptop? No? They definitely are.

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So yeah, that resulted in a mini freak out on my part where I frantically plugged, unplugged, re-plugged, and re-unplugged my laptop- all while softly muttering prayers to Jesus that if he let my computer charge just one more time, I would promise  to finally stop being such a cheap skate and just get another one. I also may have swore to go serve in a leper colony somewhere for the rest of my life.

(Yes, I know that even if the computer had went dead, I’d be able to take it somewhere to recover the files off my hard drive. I’m not a complete idiot- I was just having a complete melt down and wasn’t thinking straight. Plus, weren’t you listening? I’m a cheapskate. Paying for a new computer AND paying someone to recover the files off my old laptop to transfer to the new one? Ain’t nobody got for that.)

Well, I don’t know which one those promises to Jesus did the trick, but the signal finally did connect between my old Acer and the charger. Crisis averted-temporarily anyway. Now I had to keep  my promise and buy a new laptop. (I’m choosing to assume that He knows my promise about the lepers was just Jessica being His usual, crazy, overeaacting Jessica. He knows I’d be useless in a leper colony, anyway)

Hushpuppies3

 I got my new laptop a couple of days later, and it’s pretty awesome. All my other laptops have been ‘economic’ purchases, where I bought something that would suit my purposes, but wasn’t the ‘one’ I wanted.

This HP ENVY x360- 15 Touch laptop, is definitely what I want. It’s not only beautiful, it also came with as much space as I could get on a laptop without being a desktop computer. I would definitely recommend it to anyone looking for a new laptop… and isn’t a Mac fan. Because I’m not. #TeamPC til the day I die.

Anyway, moving onto the food. I decided to put a real Southern meal on my family’s table and this was one of the things I made to go on the side with the rest of the food (other recipes from that meal to follow).

Hushpuppies4

Why are these things called hushpuppies? Do we have something against just calling them what they are (cornmeal fritters)? I was curious, so I did some research (meaning I just googled it) and found out that they get their name from the Civil War Era, where they were thrown to hunting dogs to keep them from scaring prey away, or at picnics/cookouts to make them  ‘hush’. True? Maybe, maybe not- but all I know is that just bout everyone seems to love them.

Hushpuppies are a staple of classic Southern food- they’ve got to be done right, and these don’t disappoint. The exterior is perfectly browned and crisp, with the inside soft and tender. I eat mine several different ways: doused in Frank’s Red Hot, crumbled over my greens, or even dipped in ketchup (it’s good, trust me).

These are an excellent side dish- or you could just eat them all on their own. I wouldn’t judge you.

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Hushpuppies

Recipe Courtesy of Pat and Gina Neely

CLICK HERE FOR PRINTABLE VERSION

Ingredients

  • Peanut oil, for frying
  • 1 cup yellow cornmeal
  • 3/4 cup self rising flour
  • 1 teaspoon kosher salt, plus more to taste
  • 1/2 teaspoon sugar
  • 1/2 teaspoon cayenne pepper
  • 1/2 teaspoon smoked paprika
  • 1/2 small Vidalia onion, finely grated
  • 4 scallions, thinly sliced
  • 1 cup buttermilk
  • 1 large egg, beaten
  • 1/4 cup grated cheddar cheese, optional

Directions

1. Preheat 2 inches peanut oil in a deep-fryer or Dutch oven to 375. Whisk the cornmeal, flour, 1 teaspoon salt, the sugar, cayenne and paprika in a large bowl to get rid of the lumps.

2. Mix in the remaining ingredients, stirring well to combine.

3. Dip 2 spoons into a mug of water (this allows the batter to come clean off). Scoop up about 1 1/2 tablespoons of the batter and carefully slide it into the hot oil, working in batches. Fry the scoops of batter 3 to 5 minutes, or until golden brown and cooked all the way through (test the first one for doneness).

4. Remove and drain on a paper towel-lined baking sheet, seasoning with salt as they come out of the fryer.