Roasted Garlic Pot Roast

As the autumn progresses and the weather begins to cool down, there are certain foods that I start getting crazy cravings for. I’ve already mentioned this with regards to baking which is why for the past few weeks I’ve been sharing a bunch of sweets that have appeased my fall sweet tooth. However my seasonal needs definitely apply to savory foods too. The colder it gets, the more you want ‘stick to your ribs’ kind of food that warms you up on the inside and just makes you want to curl up and take a nap after dinner.

Pot roast is one of those dishes for me and I think it’s pretty safe to say it is for most people. It’s red meat that’s roasted in gravy, usually served with some kind of starch like mashed potatoes and rice. What’s not to love about it? Not only is it delicious, it’s easy to throw together, then allow to cook in the oven or the slow cooker.

With comfort food, there’s usually not a lot of bells and whistles to the preparation, and that’s really how it ought to be. Simple, minimal ingredients. Not too much effort. Maximum taste and satisfaction.

And wouldn’t you know it? I happen to have just the dish for y’all to make for autumn that really does deliver on all three.

Before I’d made this dish, I had never even tried roasted garlic before. I’d certainly never roasted it myself. After having changed both of those circumstances, I’m now resolved to never eat it any other way *but* roasted. You just wouldn’t believe how easy it is to make, and how much of a difference it makes in flavor.

Because the garlic is the main ‘star’ of the dish, this recipe does call for quite a bit to be roasted at one time. Four to six heads, actually. Yes–whole heads. It sounds like overkill, but it isn’t. You’re using it in both the marinade AND in the dish itself, which will result in a gravy you want packed with flavor. Also keep in mind, if you absolutely insist on dialing back the garlic flavor you can always use a smaller amount and stash the leftover in your fridge for another use.

Roasting the garlic is fool-proof. You drizzle the garlic heads with olive oil and wrap them in a foil package. You place that foil package in a baking dish, then throw the baking dish into the oven for about an hour. After letting them cool off, you’ll be able to easily pluck the cloves off the head and give them a good squeeze; they’ll come out of the skins like a smooth pulp. That kids, is roasted garlic. Next to bacon fat it’s pretty much nectar of the Gods.

After letting the meat marinade overnight (something I really must insist that you do), you can get to the business of searing, then roasting. We have to have a discussion about the gravy because apart from the tenderness of the meat, the gravy of a pot roast is the most important thing. It’s just gotta be ‘right’. This one is more than right. It’s friggin fantastic.

Roasted Garlic. Beer. Crushed Ginger Snaps. Tomato Paste. All of that (and a bit more) is included in the gravy that’s made with this roast and it all works together. The taste is (of course) garlicky, but it’s also tangy, sweet and a bit spicy. I didn’t even have to thicken it over the stove after the roast was cooked through–the consistency is perfect straight out of the Dutch oven.

A few things are needless to say, but I’ll say them anyhow: first, we gobbled this up. Second, I’m probably not going to wait until autumn every year to cook this roast. It’s the year-round good eats variety. Third, I now look for excuses to put roasted garlic in *all* of my savory dishes. I’m currently searching for a way to incorporate it into my bread-making routine. Fourth, you all should be planning on trying this for yourselves. Sharing this post at the Fiesta Friday #194, co-hosted this week by  Petra @ Food Eat Love and Vanitha @ Curry and Vanilla.

Have a good weekend, all.

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Roasted Garlic Pot Roast

Recipe Adapted from Laura Frankel

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Ingredients

For Roasted Garlic

  • 4-6 heads of garlic
  • About 1 tablespoon of oil (olive, canola, vegetable are all fine)
  • Salt & pepper

For Marinade

  • 1 head of roasted garlic (see above)
  • 1/2 cup light or dark brown sugar
  • About 1-2 tablespoons Soy sauce
  • 1/3 cup balsamic vinegar
  • 2 tablespoons tomato paste
  • Seasoned salt, pepper, onion powder

For Roast/Sauce

  • About 5-6 lb chuck roast, trimmed of excess fat and preferably tied
  • 2 large yellow sweet onions, thickly sliced
  • 3 heads of the roasted garlic (you can use less if you want less garlic flavor)
  • 2 14.5 oz cans of low-sodium beef broth
  • 1-2 cups of Guinness beer (or another stout; just as long as it’s something you’d be fine with drinking)
  • 1 1/2 cups finely crushed ginger snaps (I used Trader Joe’s gingersnaps)
  • 1/3 cup tomato paste
  • A few dashes of fish sauce (soy sauce works fine too)
  • 1 tablespoon Worcestershire sauce
  • 1 teaspoon ground cinnamon
  • 1 teaspoon ground coriander
  • Salt & pepper to taste

 

Directions

Preheat oven to 350° F.  Peel the loose skin away from the garlic and cut the tops off of the heads, but make sure the cloves stay attached to each other. Place them on a long strip of aluminum foil. Drizzle them with the oil and sprinkle evenly with salt & pepper.

Draw up the ends of the foil and tightly seal it into a package. Place the foil package in a shallow dish. Roast in the oven for about 50 minutes. Allow to cool completely, then remove the roasted garlic to a small bowl by pressing the cloves out of the remaining skins and into a small bowl with your fingers (they should come out easily).

Place the beef in a sealable plastic container or a Ziploc bag. Rub the soy sauce over the surface of the meat, then sprinkle evenly with salt/pepper/onion powder. In a small bowl, combine the 1 head of roasted garlic, brown sugar, vinegar and tomato paste. Mash and stir together into a paste with a fork. Pour this over the meat. Seal and refrigerate overnight.

Preheat oven to 350°. Heat about 1 tablespoon of oil in the bottom of a Dutch oven or pot over high heat.  Sear the meat on both sides until a crust forms, about 2-3 minutes per side. Remove to a platter and cover with foil (don’t wipe out the bottom of the pot). Add the onions and stir together. Add the beer and deglaze the pot, scraping up the bottom bits. Place the onions with the meat. Add the crushed ginger snaps, tomato paste, fish sauce, Worcestershire sauce, beef broth, cinnamon, coriander to the pot and stir together. Add salt & pepper to taste. (If the sauce is too thick you can add additional broth, beer or water to thin it out).

Place the beef and onions back into the pot. Cover with lid or tightly with aluminum foil and roast in the oven, about 1 1/2-2 hours, until a fork can pierce through the thickest part of the meat easily. Allow to stand for about 10 minutes before slicing and serving with the sauce given off in the pot.

Texas BBQ Pot Roast

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It’s January. It’s cold outside. In most parts of the country, the weather is pretty crappy. It still gets dark pretty early in the evening. It’s Friday afternoon.

And you-know-who is now the president.

All of the above means that we deserve some MAJOR comfort food.

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I almost didn’t post this recipe. Almost. The lighting on the day I cooked it was REALLY bad, to the point where there was barely any sunlight outside at all and very little natural light to shine on the food.

All my fellow food bloggers out there know that shooting pictures of monochrome ‘brown’ foods like beef are difficult enough as it is, but without sunlight? Eh. It’s not picnic, I’ll tell you.

But ultimately I decided, what the heck? It’s a few hunks of beef. I think it looks like a few hunks of beef. Maybe not as pretty as they could be, but what makes a dish at the end of the day is the taste.

And I promise you, it does not fail to deliver on that.

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There’s not many bells and whistles to this dish. It takes the sweet and tangy flavors that remind me of barbecue and infuses them into a hunk of beef that is cooked low and slow in the oven until fork tender. It’s no grilled so we obviously don’t have that charred, charcoal flavor, but…it’s still pretty great stuff.

In fact, upon tasting, my older sister remarked that the sauce that it produces is VERRRRRRY close to the homemade barbecue sauce that our grandmother always made for holidays when we would grill out.

Which suffice to say, is very high praise indeed.

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The low roasting temp makes the beef come out so juicy, moist and tender. The sauce that it makes is the perfect blend of sweet and tangy flavors. It made for an absolutely delicious sandwich, guys. I mean, wow. I ate mine with caramelized onions and peppers and pickled gherkins, as pictured. But however you’d like to eat it, I guarantee you’ll be satisfied.

Linking this post up to Fiesta Friday #155. Y’all be easy.

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Texas BBQ Pot Roast

Recipe Adapted from Family Circle Magazine

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Ingredients

  • 1 pot roast (about 4-5 pounds), such as bottom round or chuck (I used a London Broil cut)
  • 2 teaspoons vegetable oil
  • 1 tablespoon onion powder
  • 1 tablespoon smoked paprika
  • 1/2 tablespoon black pepper
  • 1 teaspoon seasoning salt
  • 1 cup bottled barbecue sauce (I used Sweet Baby Ray’s Hickory Brown Sugar)
  • 1/2 cup cider vinegar
  • 1/2 cup chicken or beef broth
  • 1/8 cup packed light-brown sugar
  • 1 tablespoon Dijon or Honey Dijon mustard
  • 1 tablespoon Worcestershire sauce
  • 1 tablespoon chili powder
  • 1 large onion (1/2 pound), chopped
  • 1 large green bell pepper, sliced
  • 4 large cloves garlic, crushed and minced

 

Directions

Preheat the oven to 300 degrees Fahrenheit.

Prick the meat all over with a fork or knife on both sides.

In a small bowl, combine the onion powder, smoked paprika, pepper and seasoning salt. Rub the mixture evenly over both sides of the meat.

Heat the oil in a large Dutch Oven or pot over the stove over medium high heat. Just before it starts to smoke, sear the meat in the pot until a crust forms on surface, about 3-5 minutes per side. Remove the meat to a plate and cover with aluminum foil. Set aside.

Place the onions and green pepper together in the Dutch oven and sauté them in the residual oil and drippings until just tender/translucent. Add the garlic and cook for about one minute more until the garlic is fragrant.

In a medium bowl, combine the barbecue sauce, vinegar, broth, mustard, Worcestershire sauce, and chili powder. Pour into the Dutch oven and bring to a boil. Remove from the heat.

Add the meat back into the pot, cover and place in the oven. Roast for about 3 to 4 hours, until the meat is fork tender, turning the meat every hour or so.

Let the meat stand in the pot for about 30 minutes. In the meanwhile, drain off about 2 cups of the liquid from the pot and place in a small saucepan. Bring the liquid in saucepan to a boil, then reduce heat to medium low and allow to simmer until thickened into a sauce. Skim off the fat on the surface, then serve with the meat.

Pot Roast-Style Meatballs

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Happy Day-After-Thanksgiving Everyone!

Did you all have a great holiday with their families? Cook a lot? Eat too much? Watch lots of TV?

Was anyone brave enough to venture out this morning for Black Friday- I hope not. Honestly I just don’t think it’s worth the effort anymore. The Internet and online shopping has (I think) done a good job of making it so that there doesn’t necessarily have to be such a rush or panic for good deals. Granted, there are some things that you have to go and stand in line to get, but c’mon, honestly: are they REALLY worth it?

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Alright, alright. I confess: I have participated in Black Friday a handful of times before. But it was mostly during the 90’s, when online shopping was just getting started and stores were only making their deals available in-house. It does give you a weird kind of adrenaline rush, but not a particularly enjoyable one. Me, I’m a worrier: so naturally, the build up to Black Friday for someone like me would be the fear that I’m getting up early in the morning, risking my safety and raising my stress level for something I’m not even 100% guaranteed to get. What if I can’t run fast enough when they open the doors? What if I’m next to some psycho crazy woman who elbows me in the face as we’re reaching for the same thing? What if someone literally tries to take it out of my cart or hands even if I do get it?

Not that any of that has actually happened to me before (in fact, on the few occasions I did go out for Black Friday, I got what I wanted), but I say all of that just to emphasize that my personality is just not suited for all that craziness. I don’t like conflict, chaos or mean people…and that’s basically what Black Friday is ALL about. So I just stay out of it now.

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So, this is Pot Roast weather. You have to make pot roast during the winter. It’s pure comfort food that sticks to your ribs and just make you feel all warm and fuzzy inside. Problem  is, depending on the size of the meat, it can be a little time consuming. I encountered this problem a little while ago when I wanted some pot roast, but #1, didn’t have enough time to make it, and #2, didn’t really want to pay full price on a piece of good beef that wasn’t on sale at the grocery store. What was on sale though, was the ground turkey, which gave me the idea of trying to replicate the flavors typically found in pot roast, in a meatball. It worked out very well with my Pizza Meatballs, so I didn’t see why it would be so bad to try it out here.

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This may not be true pot roast, but I am still really happy with how it turned out. The flavors still REALLY do come out in the meatballs, and because they’re ground turkey, you can feel a little bit better about having them versus red meat (if you care about watching your red meat intake anyway). If you read the recipe, you will see that I did cut some corners and used one of those Liptons packets to make my gravy. If you’re a purist who believes in only flour-roux based gravy, then that’s fine. Make it that way. I was just in a hurry and needed some gravy for my pot roast meatballs, and this does the job in a pinch. All in all, this is dish turned out really good. It’s not pot roast, but it definitely still has that comforting, stick to your ribs quality that’s really good for this time of year.

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I was very glad that Angie@TheNoviceGardener asked me back to co-host this weeks Fiesta Friday #44 with my good friend Prudy@ButterBasilandBreadcrumbs. It’s a real treat, and I hope all of you can join us, as we always have a lot of fun. If you’re interested in swinging by to contribute, or even just to see what the rest of us are bringing to the party this week, then just click the icon link below. Hope to see you there!

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Pot Roast-Style Meatballs

Recipe by Jess

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Ingredients

For Meatballs

  • 3 lbs. ground turkey
  • 1 lb. Turkey sausage
  • 1 packet (.87 oz) of onion (or brown) gravy mix (Like Liptons)
  • 2 tsp. dried oregano
  • 1 tsp. dried basil
  • 1/4 tsp. ground thyme
  • A few dashes of Worcestershire sauce
  • 1 1/2 cups Panko breadcrumbs (and 1/2 cup more, if needed)
  • 1 egg, beaten

For Gravy

  • 1 packet of Brown gravy mix (Like Liptons)
  • 1-2 tbsp. flour

 Directions

1. Preheat oven to 350°. Place a wire rack over a half sheet pan and spray with non-stick cooking spray. Set aside

2. Combine all ingredients for meatballs together in a large bowl. If mixture feels too wet to shape, then add remaining half cup of breadcrumbs.

3. Shape meat into golf-ball sized meatballs and place onto wire rack. Bake in oven for 35 to 45 minutes, or until meatballs reach an inner temperature of 165° F.

4. Follow package instructions for gravy, adding additional flour to thicken, if desired. Drizzle on top of the meatballs and serve with white rice or egg noodles.

Roast Beef and Bourbon Sauce

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Show of hands: how many of you guys out there make something new for dinner every single night?

Okay. Now, still show of hands: how many of you guys out there have full time day-jobs (like 8 or 9-5:00pm) and STILL make something new for dinner every single night?

Well, since we’re not sitting in the same room together, I may as well come clean and tell you guys that my hand’s not up. Although I’m kinda the designated cook in my house- a role I’m admittedly glad to fulfill-I’m still not the type of cook that makes something new for dinner every single night when I get off work. It just doesn’t happen that way.

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When I look back on past generations where women like my grandma really did make breakfast and dinner from scratch every.single.day, I’m really in awe. I personally can’t see myself cleaning a house,doing laundry, running errands and looking after children all day like she did, THEN on top of that throwing down in the kitchen. I just don’t have the energy for that. By the time I get home during the week, just about the only thing I feel like doing is just warming my food up and sitting down to eat it.

Having said that, my personal method of ensuring that me and my family eat good food during the week while also not wearing myself out, is to just make the majority of the food on the weekend, then eat the leftovers during the week.

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I’m trying to make enough food to feed 4 people for about 5 days, so I also usually end up cooking quite a bit. Roasts, pork loins and jumbo packages of chicken breasts are usually what I look for in the grocery store sale ads- with chicken usually being the one that gets picked the most. It’s the most inexpensive, and I actually kinda prefer it to red meat and pork. Sometimes though, I’ll come across a recipe that calls for red meat that I really really really want to make, and beef will win out for the week- which is basically what happened with this recipe.

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It’s been a while since I made a beef roast, and when I found this recipe I decided that it would be the one that would break my dry spell. The prep is actually ridiculously simple-you rub the meat over with salt & pepper then sear it in grapeseed oil- and I will say that the grapeseed oil does make all the difference. It has a really delicious, almost sweet flavor that I’ve never had in using any other cooking oil. After the meat is done roasting, then you can really get down to the good stuff: guys, this… sauce. It’s just amazing. It really exceeded my expectations (not an easy task) and was the perfect accompaniment to the tender, juicy meat. I sliced the roast into thick, round slices and poured the sauce on top, then roasted some vegetables with agave to serve on the side. It’s one of the best meals I’ve made, hands down.

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And even better than that, the leftover sliced beef makes for AMAZING sandwiches throughout the week, hot OR cold.

I’m ridiculously late to the Fiesta Friday #34 party this week, hosted by Angie@TheNoviceGardener and co-hosted by Selma @Selma’s Table andElaine @Foodbod, but I’m still coming- if for nothing else, because I feel like I HAVE to share this roast beef. Have a good rest of the weekend, guys 🙂

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Roast Beef & Bourbon Sauce

Recipe Adapted from Aaron McCargo, Jr.

CLICK  HERE FOR PRINTABLE VERSION

Ingredients

For Roast Beef

  • 1/4 cup coarse sea salt
  • 1/4 cup coarse cracked black pepper
  • 2 to 3 tablespoons grapeseed oil, for searing
  • 1 whole Beef Striploin, trimmed with some fatback remaining

 

For Bourbon Sauce

  • 5 tablespoons butter, divided
  • 1 tablespoons garlic, minced
  • 1 cup onion, finely diced
  • 4 tablespoons all-purpose flour
  • 1/4 cup bourbon
  • 3 cups beef stock
  • 1 tablespoon sugar
  • 1 tablespoon cracked black pepper
  • 2 tablespoons chopped fresh parsley

Directions

1.Preheat oven to 300 degrees F.

2. Add oil to saute pan. Season meat on all sides with salt and pepper.

3. Sear meat on all sides, about 2 to 3 minutes each side.

4. Place meat on sheet tray with a rack. Roast meat for 30 to 40 minutes.

5. Crank oven up to 450 degrees F. and roast for an additional 15 to 20 minutes until crust forms and meat is nicely colored. When done, allow to rest before slicing. In a small bowl reserve juice for Bourbon Sauce.

6. In a large saucepan over medium-high heat, add 4 tablespoons butter. Add garlic, onion and cook for 4 to 5 minutes until nicely Add flour and mix well to form pasty roux.

7. Remove pan from flame. Add bourbon and scrape pan with a wooden spoon. Add stock and mix well removing any lumps.

8. Bring sauce to a boil and allow to simmer for 10 minutes until sauce thickens. Add sugar and pepper. Add 1 tablespoon cold butter and whisk together. Stir in reserved roast beef juice. Finish with parsley. Serve on top or along side of roasted meat.

Honey Garlic Pot Roast

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There are some things that never get old. No matter how often they happen, you never get tired of them. You’re always happy to see them coming, sad to see them gone, and waiting for the next time that they happen again.

Weekends. Football season. Christmas. Reruns of The Golden Girls. Cheap Honey Crisp Apples (the result of which was a wonderful Apple Cider Cinnamon Bread). I can never get enough of any of it.

Another thing that never gets old:

Pot Roast.

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Pot roast is one of those things that just about everyone can relate to in some way. We’ve all had it. We all love it. It’s everything we love about home, comfort food, and good memories. It’s wonderful on Sundays. It’s wonderful during the week after a long day after work. It’s wonderful hot. It’s wonderful cold. See where I’m going with this? It’s just everything wonderful.

I haven’t made a pot roast in a really long time. Why? I don’t know. It’s one of those unexplainable questions of the universe that we’re just not supposed to make sense of, I guess. All I knew going to the grocery store this week was that I was buying a chuck roast, and I was making a pot roast out of it. I have some recipes for some ‘unique’ pot roasts that I have yet to test out, but this time around I wanted to stay pretty traditional with my approach. Nothing fancy. No fireworks. Sometimes it’s the simplest things that have the best results.

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Pull it off on the fork, so I know it’s real.

My grandma was subscribed to this mailing database called Great American Recipes where she would receive several recipe cards in the mail for a while. Since she doesn’t like to do as much cooking as she used to, she would just give the cards to me. As a result, I’ve got quite a collection of recipe cards from GAR now- they even sent a cute little binder to put it in.

This recipe was in one of the mailing packs that they sent. It seemed like a pretty straightforward pot roast recipe, and I liked the idea of rubbing honey over the meat before searing it off. So I tried it. Well, the smell alone was enough for me to decide that this was a good life choice. And the taste was enough to make me want to slap myself silly for letting such a long time pass since I’ve last made pot roast.

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Long story short, this pot roast rocks.  Don’t be an idiot like me and take a prolonged hiatus from pot roast roast…ing. Do the right thing. Make this.

By the way, if you don’t love pot roast, then I just don’t know what you’re doing with your life.

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FEED(ME) BACK: What’s one dish you like to cook that never gets old?

Honey Garlic Pot Roast

Recipe courtesy of Great American Recipes

CLICK HERE FOR PRINTABLE VERSION

Yield: 6 servings

Ingredients

*2 tbsp vegetable oil

*2 1/2 lb boneless beef chuck roast

*2 tbsp honey

*4 cloves garlic, minced

*3 cups beef broth

*1lb. baby red potatoes, (1-1 1/2 inches in diameter) scrubbed

*1 cup of baby carrots

*2 envelopes (1 1/4 oz each) beef gravy mix

*1 can (14.5 oz) diced tomatoes with roasted garlic, drained

Directions

1. Heat the oil in a Dutch oven over medium heat. Rub the roast with the honey. Firmly press the garlic onto the roast. Cook the roast until browned on both sides, about 10 minutes.

2. Pour the broth over the roast. Bring to a boil. Reduce heat to low and simmer for 1 hour. Turn the roast over and add the potatoes and carrots. Cover roast and simmer until the roast and vegetables are tender, 45-55 minutes longer.

3. Transfer the roast and vegetables to a large deep platter, using  a slotted spoon. Discard all but 2 1/2 cups liquid from the pot. Whisk in the gravy mix and increase heat. Stir in tomatoes. Bring to a boil and cook for 2 minutes.

4. Pour half of the sauce over the roast and vegetables to serve. Pass the remaining sauce with the sauce.