Dulce de Leche Hot Chocolate

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I don’t drink hot chocolate very often, but when I do, there are a few must haves that I want in it:

It MUST be chock full of chocolatey flavor. Say no, never and not on my watch to that thin, liquidy crap from a mix that tastes like a bad weight loss shake. I want to feel like I’m drinking a melted Hershey bar, which brings me to the next important element: texture.

A good hot chocolate to me is one that is slightly thick and more robust than say, coffee in its liquidity. I’m not saying it should have necessarily stew consistency, but it should be thick enough to leave a filmy residue on the back of the spoon after you stir it. If your hot cocoa is thin and broth-like…meh. It’s a no from me dawg.

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Thirdly: I want, no I NEED to have a crap load of elements on top. You can’t just stop at the hot chocolate itself. Why? Because a good Christmas tree is nothing without it’s trimmings. You gotta bedazzle that sucka, guys. I’m talking marshmallows, caramel, chocolate syrup, whipped cream, sprinkles, crushed peppermint candy, cookie crumbs. Show your taste buds that you mean business and give it the works.

Or else, what is even the point?

For today’s recipe, I can assure you: I did not hold back. I went hard.

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This hot chocolate really does have it all. It starts with a milk base that is melted down with semi-sweet chocolate. I recommend you use good chocolate here. Hersheys bars will work fine, as will Nestle semi-sweet chocolate chips or chunks but if you can use Ghiradelli, Godiva or Dove chocolate that I think would work even better. I even think that using dark chocolate or chocolate flavored with chili powder would be awesome, just to give it another level of flavor.

So help me God, if you go and use some chalky generic store brand chocolate chips I will hunt you down, find you and shake you silly.

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You can of course make your own Dulce de Leche by either boiling or baking a single can of sweetened condensed milk, but if you can just get the pre-made Nestle one that comes in a can and is located in the Hispanic/Latino foods aisle of the grocery store,please just go with that. Less work. You can also use less of it in the cocoa if you prefer yours on the less sweet side.

Now, make sure you’ve got all the garnishments on deck once the hot chocolate is made. It’s your customizable world here, but I used whipped cream, chocolate sauce, more melted dulce de leche that I had left over from the can and Christmas nonpareil sprinkles. Also (because I just don’t know how to quit) I dipped the rims of my mugs in hot chocolate, then pressed them into a dish of crushed gingersnap cookie crumbs, then let them chill in the freezer for about 40 minutes. That way, with every sip of hot chocolate, there’s also the added texture and flavor of the spicy gingersnap sliding down your throat. I realize this is extra, but what can I say? I be’s that way sometimes.

Happy Fiesta Friday #149, (cohosted this week by Judi @ cookingwithauntjuju and Sandhya @ Indfused) where I’m linking this post.

12 Days of Christmas Banner

Day 1: Stuffing Bread

Day 2: Pumpkin Crunch Tart

Day 3: Cinnamon Roll Cookies

Day 4: Dulce de Leche Hot Chocolate

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Dulce de Leche Hot Chocolate

Recipe Courtesy of Food Network Magazine

Print

Ingredients

  • 2 1/2 cups milk
  • 2 ounces of semi sweet chocolate, chopped, plus more for drizzling
  • 1 cup dulce de leche, plus more for drizzling
  • 1 teaspoon ground cinnamon, or 1 cinnamon stick broken in half
  • Whipped cream for topping
  • Sprinkles for topping, optional

 

Directions

In a medium saucepan, bring the milk to a low simmer over medium low heat.

Add the chocolate, dulce de leche and cinnamon. Cook and stir until the chocolate and caramel has melted into the milk and mixture is smooth, about 3-5 minutes.

Pour into mugs and top with whipped cream, additional chocolate and caramel and sprinkles.

(Mixture will thicken as it cools, just add additional milk to thin out if desired.)

 

Alfajores

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So at the beginning of this week I was full of all these plans of how I was going to post a series of recipes dedicated to Cinco de Mayo. Some of you guys have been posting up some DELICIOUS looking taco recipes and Lord knows I love me a good taco.

But the truth is, I should’ve been more realistic with myself about what I would and wouldn’t have time to do. It’s been a busy past couple of days, and what with all the activity going on, I feel kinda surprised I was able to carve out time to get this post up at all.

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What’s the buzz all about? Oh well, you know…my older sister Ashley successfully defended her dissertation and earned her Ph.D yesterday.

Guys.

I am SO proud of her. Earning a doctorate is probably one of THE most difficult things I’ve ever witnessed someone take on, but if there was anyone who was up to the task, it’s my sister. She’s brilliant, hardworking, flexible, resilient– pretty much everything I want to be when I “grow up”. And brilliant; did I mention that she’s pretty brilliant?

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The “Defense” part of the process involves the candidate giving a brief presentation of their dissertation to their committee as well as any guests that attend, the committee conducting a questioning of the candidate regarding their research, briefly deliberating, then approving the dissertation itself.

It’s also an event where serving food is generally encouraged.

So, I ‘m sure you guys can guess where I came into this whole process. I ended up putting together a few dishes to serve to the guests at my sister’s defense, as well as at one of her best friend’s defenses the previous day who was also defending her dissertation. I was glad and even honored to be asked to do it, but it also meant that my plan for a Cinco de Mayo recipe series wasn’t gonna happen.

Today’s post is really all I got for ya.

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But trust and believe: it’s still enough.

More than enough.

Alfajores are a traditionally South/Latin American sandwich cookie that I’ve wanted to make for a while. I took a looksie at several recipes and figured that they didn’t look very hard to pull off at all. In fact, the most ‘challenging’ part of making an Alfajor is really only going to come down to the ‘star’ ingredient of the filling: Dulce de leche. You can make it from scratch using multiple methods….or, you can do what EYE did in a pinch, and buy a can of it at the grocery store.

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Look guys, don’t judge me.

It’s not like I don’t know how. If I had say, the 2-3 hours it takes to cook the condensed milk in the oven, then I would’ve. But this week was just too hectic for making caramel so I settled for just baking the cookies from scratch and letting Nestle do the rest.

I regret nothing.

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So I’ll be perfectly honest, I think that the cookies themselves can stand alone even without the Dulce de Leche. They’re light, slightly crisp and oh-so buttery. Think of the perfect tea biscuit and that’s what you’ve got here.

But listen: once you DO add the caramel on the inside and sprinkle the sandwiches with the powdered sugar…NIRVANA.

First of all, Dulche de Leche is yummy enough to eat all by itself on a spoon. Try and resist that urge…at least until you fill all of the cookies. The sweetness of the smooth, rich caramel complements the subtle flavor of the butter cookies perfectly. If you’re in need of a sugar fix alongside a cup of coffee or tea, or hot chocolate then I gotta say this is it.

Happy (Belated) Cinco de Mayo AND happy Fiesta Friday #118   co-hosted this week by Kaila @ GF Life 24/7 and Laurena @ Life Diet Health.

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Alfajores

Recipe Courtesy of Chowhound

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Ingredients

  • 1 cup cornstarch
  • 3/4 cup all-purpose flour, plus more as needed
  • 1 teaspoon baking powder
  • 1/2 teaspoon baking soda
  • 1/4 teaspoon fine salt
  • 8 tablespoons unsalted butter (1 stick), at room temperature
  • 1/3 cup granulated sugar
  • 2 large egg yolks
  • 1 tablespoon pisco or brandy
  • 1/2 teaspoon vanilla extract
  • 1 cup dulce de leche, at room temperature
  • Powdered sugar, for dusting

Directions

Place the cornstarch, measured flour, baking powder, baking soda, and salt in a medium bowl and whisk briefly to combine; set aside.

Place the butter and sugar in the bowl of a stand mixer fitted with a paddle attachment. Mix on medium speed, stopping the mixer to scrape down the sides of the bowl once with a rubber spatula, until the mixture is light in color and fluffy, about 3 minutes. Add the egg yolks, pisco or brandy, and vanilla and mix until incorporated, about 30 seconds. Stop the mixer and scrape down the sides of the bowl. On low speed, gradually add the reserved flour mixture and mix until just incorporated with no visible white pockets, about 30 seconds.

Turn the dough out onto a piece of plastic wrap, shape it into a smooth disk, and wrap it tightly. Place in the refrigerator until firm, at least 1 hour.

Meanwhile, heat the oven to 350°F and arrange a rack in the middle. Line 2 baking sheets with parchment paper and set aside.

Remove the dough from the refrigerator, unwrap it, and place it on a lightly floured work surface. Lightly flour the top of the dough. Roll to 1/4-inch thickness (the dough will crack but can be easily patched back together). Stamp out 24 rounds using a plain or fluted 2-inch round cutter, rerolling the dough as necessary until all of it is gone.

Place the cookies on the prepared baking sheets, 12 per sheet and at least 1/2 inch apart. Bake 1 sheet at a time until the cookies are firm and pale golden on the bottom, about 12 to 14 minutes. (The cookies will remain pale on top.) Transfer to a wire rack to cool completely.

Flip half of the cookies upside down and gently spread about 2 teaspoons of the dulce de leche on each. Place a second cookie on top and gently press to create a sandwich. Dust generously with powdered sugar before serving.

 

Sticky Caramel Pecan Babka

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The Day 5 post of the 12 Days of Christmas series is getting up a little bit later in the day/night for various reasons. I didn’t get off work until later in the evening today, and we’re actually in the process of moving to a new place this week. It’s pretty hectic on my end, but in between work, packing our stuff and moving it to our new place, trying to get my Christmas shopping finished and everything else I’m still gonna try my  hardest to get my remaining posts up in a timely fashion.

Knock on wood I can pull it off.

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How many people out there have a family tradition of eating a breakfast on Christmas morning? I know plenty of people that do; they wake up early for the kids, open up their presents, then sit down to a breakfast of cinnamon rolls, breakfasts casserole, omelettes or something else like that.

We don’t. We never really have actually.

In my family, me and my sisters did always wake up early, then wake up the adults early so we could open our presents. We were blessed kids. My grandpa- I mean, “Santa Claus”- always made sure that that process took a pretty long while. By the time we finished, my mom and grandma would give us something small to eat like some toast or fruit while they started cooking for Christmas dinner.

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However, if your family IS one of the ones who like to eat a hearty Christmas breakfast in addition to a hearty Christmas dinner, then needless to say I think that today’s post would be of HUGE interest to you.

Hold onto your butts.

I’m about to blow that old Aunt Margaret’s Christmas morning cinnamon roll recipe that you’ve been eating for years clear outta the water. You’ll forget what you ever saw in that breakfast casserole, frittata or whatever. This Christmas, I predict that you Christmas Breakfast/Brunch eaters will be consuming something else.

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Say hello to my little friend, y’all.

Babka.

Sticky.Caramel.Pecan.Babka.

And yes. It tastes every bit as delicious as it looks.

(…that’s what she said.)

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I’ve wanted to make babka for a really long time. A REALLY long time. I think it’s the swirls that got my attention in the beginning- those lovely swirls in the dough have been calling my name, just daring me to pull them off.

A special recipe like this calls for a special occasion, and the 12 Days of Christmas sure counts in my book. For you guys, I think you should put it into consideration for your Christmas breakfast/brunch.

I know I don’t have to “sell you” on it. But I will anyway.

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First off, she’s just GORGEOUS, isn’t she? Before you even slice into it, you can see the lovely swirled braid of the dough across the top. You guys may not be able to tell but the overlap of brown and gold across the top is actually a crunchy caramelized sugary crumble that bubbles up and crystallizes on top and forms a gooey sticky goo on the bottom. On the inside is a beautiful swirl of a pecan dark brown sugar filling.

In all seriousness, this has to go up there with one of the best recipes I’ve ever baked. I don’t say that lightly.  It really is.

You want my advice? Bake this baby up the night before Christmas. Then, serve up thick, buttery  toasted slices of it to your family. OR, even better: make French Toast out of it.

They may just forget all about the actual presents underneath the tree and just ask for this recipe instead.

12 Days of Christmas Banner Second

Day 1: Springerle Cookies

Day 2: Speculaas Cookies

Day 3: Gingerbread Caramel Crunch

Day 4: Cranberry Pumpkin Gingerbread

Day 5: Sticky Caramel Pecan Babka

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Sticky Caramel Pecan Babka

Recipe Courtesy of The Kitchn

Ingredients

  • 3/4 cup water
  • 1 tablespoon active dry yeast
  • 3/4 cup whole milk
  • 4 large eggs
  • 1 large egg yolk
  • 3/4 cup sugar
  • 1 1/2 teaspoons salt
  • 1 1/2 teaspoons vanilla extract
  • 6 1/4 – 6 1/2 cups all-purpose flour
  • 12 tablespoons unsalted butter, softened to room temperature

For sticky filling:

  • 2 1/4 cups pecans
  • 3/4 cups butter (salted)
  • 1 1/2 cups packed dark brown sugar
  • 3 teaspoons cinnamon

For the egg wash:

  • 1 large egg yolk
  • 1 tablespoon whole milk or cream

Directions

Combine the water and the yeast in the bowl of a stand mixer, and let stand until the yeast is dissolved. Add the milk, eggs, yolk, sugar, salt, and vanilla extract, and whisk until the yolks are completely combined. Add 6 1/4 cups of flour and stir with a stiff spatula until a shaggy, floury dough is formed.

Using a dough hook, knead on medium-low speed until the dough comes together and is no longer floury, about 5 minutes. With the mixer still running, begin adding the butter in 1-tablespoon blobs. Mix until one blob is just barely incorporated before adding the next blob.

When all the butter has been added, continue kneading for another 5 minutes until the dough is silky, elastic, and quite jiggly. This won’t form a ball like regular dough — it should bunch around the dough hook and clear the sides of the dough hook, but will still be attached in a sticky dough mass to the bottom of the bowl. Add the extra 1/4 cup of flour as needed if the dough is sticking to the sides of the bowl.

Transfer the dough to your largest mixing bowl. Cover and let rise for 1 to 1 1/2 hours, until doubled in bulk. Transfer to the fridge and chill for at least an hour or up to 3 days. (This makes the dough easier to roll out in the next step; I recommend letting the dough chill overnight.)

When you’re ready to shape the loaves, prepare the filling before you take the dough out of the fridge. Heat the oven to 350°F and toast the pecans until they’re a few shades darker and very fragrant, about 10 minutes. Transfer the hot pecans to a cutting board and chop them finely while still warm. Keep chopping until no piece is larger than a grain of barley. You can also do this in a food processor — process the nuts in pulses and be careful of over-processing (which will turn the nuts into nut butter!).

In a medium bowl, mash together the softened butter, brown sugar, and cinnamon for the filling with a fork or a spoon, then work in the nuts. Keep mashing and mixing until the nuts are evenly distributed and you have formed a crumbly paste. Set this near your work surface.

Line three 8×4-inch loaf pans with long rectangles of parchment, so that the parchment hangs over the sides of the pan. Grease the pans thoroughly with non-stick spray. (If you only have two pans, bake two loaves and leave the third piece of dough in the fridge to shape and bake later.)

Remove the dough from the fridge. Sprinkle your work surface generously with flour and scrape the dough out on top. Pat the dough into a log and then use a bench scraper or sharp knife to cut it into 3 equal pieces (mine were about 21 ounces each, if you feel like weighing).

Sprinkle the work surface with a little more flour, then set one of the pieces of dough on top. Use the palms of your hands to press it into a rough rectangle shape. Rub a little flour into a rolling pin and roll the dough out into a thin rectangle, roughly 10 inches wide and 12 or more inches long (the thinner you roll, the more layers you’ll make).

Scatter a generous cup of the filling over the surface of the dough, then use the back of a spoon to spread and press the filling into an even layer. Leave about an inch of clear border at the top.

Starting with the short end closest to you, carefully roll the dough into a log. If any filling falls out, just tuck it back in. If the dough sticks to the counter, use a bench scraper to gently pry it up. When done rolling, pinch the dough to seal it closed. Dip a very sharp knife in water and gently, but swiftly, slice the log down its entire length, creating two halves with lots of layers.

To form the babka loaves, turn the halves so that the layers are facing up. Press the two halves together at the top, then twist the halves around each other, creating a spiral. Press the halves together again at the bottom. Flour your hands and lift the loaf into the loaf pan. If the loaf is a little too long for the pan, just smoosh it a little on either end to make it fit — any gaps will be filled in by the rising dough.

Repeat with the other loaves. Cover the shaped loaves and let them rise on the counter until puffy and just starting to dome over the tops of the pans, 1 to 1 1/2 hours.

 About a half hour before baking (when the loaves are puffy but not yet domed), preheat the oven to 350°F.

When the loaves have risen, whisk the yolk and the milk together to make the egg wash and gently brush it all over the surface of the loaves. Transfer the loaves to the oven and slide a baking sheet underneath to catch any syrupy drips. Bake 45 to 55 minutes — cover the loaves with foil in the last 10 to 15 minutes if the edges look like they might be starting to burn. The loaves are done when deep glossy brown and a skewer inserted in the middle comes out clean of any dough (sticky goo is ok, though!). If you want to check the temperature, the loaves should be around 200°F in the middle.

Let the loaves cool in the pan for about 20 minutes to firm up — however, don’t let them sit for much longer or the caramel will harden and it can be hard to get the loaves out of the pan.

Run a butter knife around the edges of the loaf to release it from the pan, and use the edges of the parchment to gently lift the loaf from the pan. Place them on a cooling rack and slide the parchment out from underneath.

Honey Roasted Peanut Popcorn Balls

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Welcome to Day 2 of the 12 Days of Christmas Series on Cooking is My Sport! Just in case you missed the first post yesterday, I’ll include a complete list of the recipes at the end of each post as we go through all of the days.

Let’s talk about Christmas popcorn tins. You all know which ones I’m talking about; the metal tins with the fancy, or sometimes wonky designs on the outside and three flavors of popcorn on the inside. Yeah, those. I’ve got mixed feelings about the Christmas popcorn tins. When I was young I really dug them, but in retrospect I kinda chalk that up to being a young, growing girl with a rabbit fast metabolism that could eat just about any Christmas treat without complaining. Now, eh…I’m not much of a fan. But for the sake of conversation, I’ll give my own rating of each of the flavors:

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The caramel corn is the obvious star of the three for me; there’s very little that caramelized sugar cannot make taste good, and the combination of the sweet with the saltiness of the popcorn is a pretty solid combination. Caramel corn for the win- 8/10

The regular butter popcorn is…well, regular butter popcorn. If the popcorn you’re buying is still relatively fresh (meaning it didn’t come from a dollar or low-budget store), then it’ll taste pretty decent. I gotta say though, I rarely get a strong butter flavor from it. It’s something for you to eat when you get the munchies, but not much else- 5/10

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The loser of the Christmas popcorn tins is the cheese flavored popcorn- no question. Whenever someone gave us a tin for a gift when we were growing up, none of us would touch the stuff. It just stayed there, untouched while the caramel corn and butter popcorn would get eaten. I don’t even know where to start with what’s wrong with the cheese popcorn: for one, the cheese coating just tastes so artificial and processed. Number two, it sticks and coats on your hands and turns them orange (blegh, yucky fingers). Three, there’s just something about the cheese coating that makes the popcorn taste stale to me. I’ll pass on the cheese popcorn every time, thank you- 2/10

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Before I even started baking for the Christmas series on the blog, I knew I wanted to make popcorn balls. They’re easy, they make GREAT gifts for friends and co-workers at Christmas parties, you can poke holes through them and hang them on a tree for decoration, and there are so many different flavor combinations that you can use when putting them together. I did two flavors this year, and this was one of them.

Think about a sweetened honey roasted peanut; now think about the saltiness of that peanut meeting and melting with a sticky caramel coating. That’s what these are. Salty, sweet balls of goodness. Think it can’t get better than that? Think again- the stickiness of the coating is tempered by the crunchy outer layer of sesame seeds that the balls get rolled in after they’re molded. So friggin good. I literally had to stop myself after taking an undisclosed amount of bites. They’re kryptonite powerful. So you should get in your kitchen and make some, stat.

Thanks for following our series, and once again: if you’re late to party then feel free to check out the complete list of recipe links for this year’s 12 Days of Christmas below!

12 Days of Christmas Banner

Day 1: Cranberry-Clementine Toaster Tarts

Day 2: Honey Roasted Peanut Popcorn Balls

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Honey Roasted Peanut Popcorn Balls


Recipe Adapted from Food Network Magazine

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Ingredients

  • 12 cups freshly popped popcorn (preferably made over the stove)
  • 1/4 cup honey
  • 2 tbsp. butter, plus 2-3 extra tbsp. for buttering your hands
  • 1/4 cup creamy peanut butter
  • 1/2 cup confectioner’s sugar
  • 1 tbsp. water
  • 1 cup honey roasted peanuts, roughly chopped
  • Toasted sesame seeds, for rolling (about 3/4 cup)

 Directions

1. Bring honey, butter, peanut butter, confectioners’ sugar and water to a boil in a large pot over medium heat, stirring.

2. Remove from the heat; using a rubber spatula, stir in popcorn and 1 cup chopped salted mixed nuts until coated.

3. Butter your hands, then shape into balls and roll in toasted sesame seeds, working quickly before balls cool off. Place finished balls on parchment paper lined baking racks to set.

Caramel Snickerdoodle Cake

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So today, I’d like to say a few things about September 27th.

(Yes, I’m aware that today is the 26th. I just don’t want to talk about the 26th. I want to talk about the 27th.)

On September 27th, 1779, John Adams formally negotiated the Revolutionary War peace terms with Great Britain.

On September 27th, 1821, the Mexican Empire formally announced independence.

On September 27th, 1908, Henry Ford’s first Ford Model T automobile was leaves the Piquette Plant in Detroit, Michigan.

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On September 27th, 1919, the Democratic National Committee voted to allow female voters.

On September 27th, 1954 “The Tonight Show” first premiered, hosted by Steven Allen.

On September 27th, 1983, basketball legend Larry Bird signed a seven-year contract with the Boston Celtics worth $15 million. The contract made him the highest paid Celtic in history.

Then, on September 27th, 1989 (9:01 a.m. to be exact)…something else happened.

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A baby girl was delivered by C-section in a hospital on a remote Army base in Montana. She was me.

So yeah, guys: tomorrow (September 27th) will be my 25th birthday. I’ve officially hit the middle of my twenties-five years past twenty…and five years away from being thirty. Ouch. Why does just typing that out make me feel old?

Birthdays haven’t been very much of a big deal to me for years. I’ve never actually had a birthday party. Most of them have either been spent at home while my mom or grandma made me a special dinner and cake, or in more recent years, out for a celebratory dinner at a restaurant. Not much of a big deal, which is fine with me. I’m a self-proclaimed introvert and I my social life is very private. I don’t need much of a fuss.

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This year however, was special in that, this was the first time that I’ve ever made me and Jas our own birthday cake. I’ll admit, the blog was a huge factor in pushing me to make that decision. I usually don’t make very many cakes in our house, but for some reason I just felt a necessity to bake a  really good birthday cake for a post. So after running several different ideas by Jas, I finally settled on this cake as one.  We both were very impressed with the result. Despite the title, I wouldn’t say that the flavor mimics a snickerdoodle cookie perfectly- however, you get a lot of the cinnamon, earthy and rich flavors that remind you of autumn baked goods. The texture is very moist and soft, thanks to the sour cream.The icing really sends the whole dish over the top- it’s good enough to eat off a spoon, no joke.

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I’d like to give a small shout out to my twin sister Jas real quick:

We made it to 25 years, chick. Thanks for being a pretty awesome ‘womb-mate’ for nine months, and an even greater roommate for the last 25. It’s been a great ride. You’re not just my twin sister- you’re the person who knows me the most in the entire world- both the good and bad. Happy Birthday. You know I love you.

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I’ll be taking this cake to this week’s Fiesta Friday #35, hosted by Angie@TheNoviceGardener and co-hosted this week by Prudy and Naina. Hope to see you all there 😉

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Caramel Snickerdoodle Cake

Recipe Adapted from Gold Medal Flour

CLICK HERE FOR PRINTABLE VERSION

Ingredients

  • 1 and 3/4 cups plus 2 tablespoons sugar
  • 2 teaspoons ground cinnamon
  • 2 1/2 cups all-purpose flour
  • 2 teaspoons baking soda
  • 1teaspoon salt
  • 1 can (5 oz) evaporated milk
  • 1 cup sour cream
  • 1/2 cup butter or margarine, melted
  • 1 teaspoon vanilla
  • 2 eggs, beaten

Cinnamon Icing

  • 1 1/2 cups powdered sugar
  • 1 tablespoon butter, melted
  • 1 tsp ground cinnamon
  • 2 tbsp. milk
  • 1/4 tsp vanilla extract

Directions

1. Heat oven to 350°F.

2. Grease 12-cup fluted tube cake pan with shortening. In small bowl, mix 2 tablespoons of the sugar and 1 teaspoon of the cinnamon. Sprinkle mixture over inside of pan, turning to evenly coat. Shake out any excess.

3. In large bowl, mix remaining 1 3/4 cups sugar, remaining 1 teaspoon cinnamon, the flour, baking soda and salt.

4. Stir remaining evaporated milk, sour cream, melted butter, vanilla and eggs into dry ingredients until well blended. Pour batter in pan.

5. Bake 40 to 50 minutes or until toothpick inserted in center comes out clean. Let stand 30 minutes; remove from pan. Cool completely, about 1 hour.

6. Combine all remaining ingredients. Add more powdered sugar or milk if need be to achieve correct consistency. Icing should be slightly thicker than a glaze, but not as thick as a frosting. Using offset spatula, spread icing over cooled cake. Allow to harden for about 30 minutes. Serve.