My Grandma’s Cornbread

Grandmas Cornbread2

There’s  a great and mighty war being fought in the United States right now.

No, not that one.

Nope, not that one either.

This one is about something different, something very complicated. The two sides have grappled, struggled and fought with each other for decades, maybe even over a hundred years. They just can’t reach an agreement over the issue at stake- not even a compromise. There’s no end in sight for this war. It could just go on forever.

You know what war I’m talking about, right?

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The Cornbread War.

I’m serious, guys. No, really. I am.

Here’s the thing: there are typically 2 types of corn breads made in the US. The first type is thought of as ‘Northern’ cornbread; it’s made with a majority of flour with a small portion of cornmeal added to the batter so that it’s moist, soft and almost cakey in texture. It’s also pretty sweet. Then there’s ‘Southern’cornbread: this batter is almost completely cornmeal with just a little bit of flour added to it. The texture is therefore coarser and almost crumbly. It’s hardly ever sweet and in most cases, is actually on the salty side.

People who prefer Northern cornbread are adamant that theirs is better. Southern cornbread lovers are of the general opinion that their cornbread IS cornbread. Anything else is just an imposter.

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Personally I have to admit: I am usually willing to be on either of the ‘sides’ in the Cornbread War. Both taste fine to me. However, I will say this: given the choice, any day, I will always always ALWAYS pick my Grandma’s cornbread.

And mu grandma’s cornbread is Southern to a T.

This is a recipe I’ve wanted to share on the blog for a while. It’s very important to our family, as this is something that I’ve literally been eating all my life. Hopefully I’ll be eating it right up to the day I die.  I can cook some pretty fancy stuff if I wanted to, but a hunk of this cornbread served with a big bowl of my grandma’s collard greens are really all I need for a satisfying meal. She’s made this bread so many times, she doesn’t even need to measure out the ingredients; she literally just pours them into a bowl, mixes it up and bakes it off without even paying that much attention.

And it still comes out perfect every time.

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I wouldn’t share this recipe for anything less than a special occasion and today is certainly a VERY special occasion as it happens to be the One Year Anniversary of Fiesta Friday at The Novice Gardener. A great big HUGE congratulations to Angie on reaching this milestone- thanks for gathering together so many talented bloggers and letting them share all of their wonderful creations week after week at the parties. I also have to throw out a thank you to Nancy@FeastingwithFriends for being the one who first introduced me to the Fiesta Friday link up in the first place- I’m so glad she did. Let’s keep it rockin on, guys.

The Part 1 of our Anniversary party at the Fiesta is being hosted this week by  Hilda @Along The Grapevine and Julianna @Foodie On Board. Make sure you come on out and join us!

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My Grandma's Cornbread

Recipe Courtesy of Jess@CookingisMySport

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Ingredients

  • 2 1/2 cups yellow cornmeal
  • 1/2 cup all purpose flour
  • 1 1/2 tbsp. baking powder
  • 1 large egg, beaten well
  • 2 tbsp. sugar
  • 2 tbsp. liquid bacon grease/drippings
  • 1/4 cup butter, melted
  • 1 tsp. salt
  • About 1 cup of Milk (or as much as necessary)

Directions

1. Preheat oven to 400°. Spray an 8-inch square pan (or a cast iron skillet) with cooking spray.

2. Combine all of the ingredients in a bowl, adding the milk in small increments– the batter should be thick, but not so stiff that it can’t be poured out.

3. Bake in the oven for 20-25 minutes, or until a toothpick comes out clean when inserted in the middle.